Read Harry Styles’ Speech Inducting Stevie Nicks Into Rock Hall 2019


Tonight, Stevie Nicks was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame during a ceremony at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn. After duetting with Nicks on "Stop Dragging My Heart Around," Harry Styles gave a speech introducing Nicks. Read it below in full.

Follow all of Pitchfork’s coverage of the 34th Annual Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony.

Hello. Just like the white winged dove sings a song sounds like she’s singing, Stevie Nicks is the first female artist to be inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame for a second time. The first female artist to be inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame for a second time. First with Fleetwood Mac and now for her unforgettable solo work. With Stevie, you’re not celebrating music long ago from the mists of time. She was standing on stage, headlining a place this size, doing her best work just three nights ago.

She is forever current. She is forever Stevie. But what exactly does that mean? In my family, we listened at home, we listened in the car, we listened wherever we could. “Dreams” was the first song I knew all the words to before I knew what the words really meant. I thought it was a song about the weather, but I knew that it was a beautiful song about the weather. I always knew the words and I loved them all. “Thunder only happens when it’s raining. Players only love you when they’re playing.”

She’s so wise and serene. She sees all the romance and drama in the world and she celebrates it. She will stand on stage introducing song telling you how she wrote them honestly, like you’re the only other person in the world. You’re more than a fan. You are her friend, and her words say in so many ways, “I understand you and you are not alone.” And that is true Stevie.

She walked a path tread by Janis Joplin, Joni Mitchell—visionary women who had to throw a couple of elbows to create their own space. Her early band Fritz opened for Jimi Hendrix and they helped her out. She was far ahead of her time, creating her own sound. It was bright. It was fresh. It was magical.

Next, she formed a duo with Fritz’s bassist, Lindsey Buckingham: Buckingham-Nicks. Then on New Years Eve, 1974, Mick Fleetwood invited Lindsey Buckingham and herself to join Fleetwood Mac, and everybody’s lives became brilliant and a lot crazier.

Stevie Nicks stepped onto the world’s stage with unforgettable ease. I remember it well. She began creating stories that flowed from her heart to her pen which ended up in our souls with characters we’ll always remember. Classic songs like “Silver Springs,” “Rihannon,” “Gypsy,” and “Sara.” In the 1980s, she released Bella Donna, the rare first solo album that was as powerful as the supergroup she was still in. With “Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around,” she and Tom Petty took things to another level.

Then she did it again with albums like The Wild Path and Rock a Little. Whether on her own, in a duet, with her band, it’s probable at some point she found herself in a barbershop quartet. Stevie could do it all, and that is true Stevie.

You can’t take her eyes off her, as we’ve seen tonight. She’s the magical gypsy godmother who occupies the in-between. It’s a space that can only be hers. She’s a lot like a rock’n’roll Nina Simone, finding the notes only she can. And by being so unapologetically herself, she gives others permission to do the same, and that is true Stevie.