The Milky Way Halo


The halo of the Milky Way has many different components, among them the dark matter halo, the gaseous halo and more compact objects like satellite galaxies, globular clusters and stellar tidal streams. With this chart here I have tried to depict the compact kind of objects as seen from Earth, with known (or at least suspected) populations and relations between the objects color-coded (see below). The biggest problem was the concentration of globular clusters towards the galactic center, resulting from the fact that many of these orbit close to the galactic bulge. To avoid completely unreadable clutter there the names of objects close to the galactic center only appear at higher zoom levels.

In the last decades many discoveries have improved our picture of the Milky Way halo. In particular the Sloan Digital Sky survey (SDSS) and several infrared surveys of the galactic plane have netted plenty of globular clusters (GCs), dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs), very faint dwarf galaxies (UFDs), intermediates that may be one or the other (GC/UFD), and stellar tidal streams or 'overdensities' in our close galactic neighborhood. With the SDSS extending into the southern hemisphere, and the results of the Gaia mission, many more discoveries are to be expected. As it is, the count now stands at 232 companions, 172 GCs, 46 satellite galaxies and 14 intermediates with ambiguous properties.

The lines in the map are the major identified tidal streams or great circles of alignment (see below). Switch the different components of the galactiic halo on and off with the checkboxes below the map. Zoom and pan with mouse wheel/pinch and dragging. To enjoy the view at full browser width, click on the "Make Full Width" button. The source for the underlying map can be found at my Github repository.

The main difference between GCs and dwarf galaxies is that GCs only had a single burst of star formation and therefore a uniform stellar population. This makes it possible to determine their relative ages from the distribution of stars in color-magnitude diagrams (see next paragraph). Dwarf galaxies, on the other hand, are more diverse, many still have ongoing star formation, and likely a central black hole. Several GCs (omega Cen) have also been found to contain a central black hole and diverse populations; because of this they may be the remnant nuclei (N) of former galaxies. These include M 54, likely the core of the Sagittarius dwarf, NGC 2808, possibly the core of the CMa dwarf, NGC 2419 and Omega Centauri with no known associations at this point. (Mackey, van den Bergh 2005).

Halo populations and streams

Based on their characteristics, the globular clusters (GCs) of the Milky Way fall into different populations. The main distinguishing features are orbital motion and position, age estimated from the horizontal branch morphology and metallicity. The diagram on the right shows the relation of the latter two parameters for GCs of the Milky Way and some of its satellites. The curved lines are thought to be isochrones, i.e., they denote constant age along their path. The horizontal branch morphology refers to the distribution of stars that have left the main sequence and appear distributed horizontally on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, including RR Lyrae variable stars, the small cousins of Cepheids. The horizontal branch ratio is the ratio between stars to the right (red) side and on the left (blue) side of the RR Lyrae region of the distribution. A good overview of HB stars can be found in Catelan 2009.

Three distinct populations can be identified: Old metal-rich GCs in the galactic bulge and disk (BD), old metal-poor GCs of the old halo (OH) and younger metal-poor GCs of the young halo (YH), which are also mostly further away from the galactic center than the old halo members (Zinn 1993).

It is thought that the bulge/disk and old halo formed mostly along with the Milky Way proper, while the young halo contains GCs caught from accreted dwarf galaxies at a later time. It should be noted that 'young' and 'old' here are not absolute categories, but merely relative indicators of age, so that a 'young halo' cluster may still be 10 billion years old, which is still younger then the Milky Way proper.

Of the known satellites many show signs of tidal disruption, among them the Canis Major dwarf spheroidal (CMa), the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal (Sgr) galaxies and the Magellanic stream (Mag) containing both Magellanic Clouds and several dwarf spheroidals. Each of these is associated with GCs and dwarfs which may be remnants of this tidal disruption, they are listed in the table below. (Forbes, Bridges 2010)

Several dwarfs and GCs lie along a great circle around the galactic center, called the Fornax-Leo-Scuptor (FLS) great circle after its main members, shown as the pink line in the chart. It is not quite clear yet if these are related remnants of a broken-up galaxy or represent a chance alignment, but there is mounting evidence that at least some of the members are indeed related. Other research sees all of the Milky Way's dwarf companions aligned in a "disk of galaxies" (Kroupa et al. 2004).

Another indicator of possible extragalactic origin is a retrograde motion (R), at this point there is no alignment or association known, so it is included as just an indicator.

Not shown: Gaseous and stellar clouds, open clusters in the Milky Way halo, Globular Clusters of (undisrupted) satellite galaxies. The four largest of which - the Magellanic Clouds, the Fornax and the Sagittarius dwarf - are known to contain their own globular cluster systems. Intriguingly, all of these are also associated with tidal features, as shown above.

The Virgo stream or Virgo stellar over-density is a very faint and very disrupted remnant that has been found in SDSS data. Recent analysis (Martinez 2006) has shown that it most likely represents the remains of an older loop of the Sagittarius dwarf around the Milky Way. Another tidal feature, the Monoceros stream or Anti-center stream, also found in SDSS data, probably is a part of the CMa dwarf's tidal stream that wraps several times around the Milky Way. Yet more debris streams have been reported in Grillmair 2006, one of which may be related to the Boötes III dSph. And more discoveries of Halo features are sure to come with further SDSS and other studies.

The list shows the members of the different halo components ordered by galactic longitude. The values are: Name(s) of the object, galactic longitude and latitude in degrees, absolute visual magnitude, half light radius in parsec, distance from the Milky Way center in kiloparsec, morphological type, population and stream membership (see below).

Name Alt. Name l b Mv Rh Dgc Metal. Type Pop Stream
 ° ° mag pc kpc [Fe/H] (1) (2) 
Milky Way GC 0 0 -20.9 460 SABbc I-II 
NGC 6723  0.07 -17.30 -7.8 4.1 2.6 -0.96 GC OH 
NGC 6287  0.13 11.02 -7.4 2.0 2.1 -1.91 GC OH 
NGC 6558  0.20 -6.02 -6.5 3.5 1.0 -1.44 GC OH 
NGC 6569  0.48 -6.68 -8.3 4.1 2.9 -0.86 GC OH 
Palomar 5  0.85 45.86 -5.2 20.0 18.6 -1.24 GC YH 
NGC 6325  0.97 8.00 -6.9 2.2 1.1 -1.17 GC OH 
NGC 6522  1.02 -3.93 -7.7 2.4 0.6 -1.44 GC OH 
NGC 6528  1.14 -4.17 -6.6 1.0 0.6 -0.04 GC BD 
NGC 6652  1.53 -11.38 -6.7 1.9 2.8 -0.97 GC OH 
M69 NGC 6637 1.72 -10.27 -7.6 2.2 1.9 -0.78 GC BD 
Palomar 6  2.09 1.78 -6.8 1.8 2.2 -1.09 GC YH 
Djorg 2 ESO456-SC3 2.76 -2.51 -7.0 1.6 1.4 -0.50 GC BD 
NGC 6624  2.79 -7.91 -7.5 1.9 1.2 -0.70 GC BD 
M70 NGC 6681 2.85 -12.51 -7.1 2.4 2.1 -1.35 GC OH 
NGC 6540 Djorg 3 3.29 -3.31 -5.4 0.3 4.4 -1.20 GC OH 
BH 261 AL 3 3.36 -5.27 -4.0 1.0 2.1 -1.3 GC  
M107 NGC 6171 3.37 23.01 -7.1 5.0 3.3 -0.95 GC OH 
Terzan 7  3.39 -20.07 -5.0 6.6 16.0 -0.58 GC YH Sgr
NGC 6401  3.45 3.98 -7.9 5.8 2.7 -0.98 GC OH 
Terzan 9  3.60 -1.99 -3.8 1.5 1.6 -2.00 GC YH 
Terzan 5 Terzan 11 3.84 1.69 -7.9 2.5 2.5 0.00 GC BD (N)
M5 NGC 5904 3.86 46.80 -8.8 4.6 6.2 -1.12 GC OH 
Terzan 10  4.42 -1.86 -6.3 2.2 2.4 -0.70 GC BD 
NGC 6342  4.90 9.73 -6.4 2.2 1.7 -0.69 GC BD 
UKS 1  5.12 0.76 -6.9 2.1 8.3 -0.50 GC BD 
NGC 6553  5.25 -3.03 -7.8 2.7 2.2 -0.21 GC BD 
VVV CL001  5.27 0.78 GC BD 
M9 NGC 6333 5.54 10.70 -7.9 2.2 1.7 -1.75 GC OH 
Sgr I SagDEG 5.57 -14.16 -13.5 1550 16.0 -0.5 dSph(t)  Sgr
M54 NGC 6715 5.61 -14.09 -10.0 3.8 19.2 -1.25 GC YH Sgr (N)
Terzan 8  5.76 -24.56 -5.0 7.6 19.1 -1.80 GC OH Sgr
NGC 6544  5.84 -2.20 -6.7 1.4 5.3 -1.20 GC OH 
NGC 6356  6.72 10.22 -8.5 3.3 7.6 -0.50 GC BD 
NGC 6440  7.73 3.80 -8.7 1.4 1.3 -0.34 GC BD 
M28 NGC 6626 7.80 -5.58 -8.2 2.5 2.7 -1.45 GC OH 
NGC 6638  7.90 -7.15 -7.1 1.8 2.3 -0.99 GC OH 
Terzan 12  8.36 -2.10 -4.1 1.2 3.4 -0.50 GC BD 
Arp 2  8.55 -20.78 -5.3 15.9 21.4 -1.45 GC YH Sgr
M55 NGC 6809 8.80 -23.27 -7.5 4.5 5.3 -1.81 GC OH 
2MASS-GC02 Hurt 2 9.78 -0.62 -4.9 0.6 4.1 -0.66 GC  
NGC 6642  9.81 -6.44 -6.8 1.8 1.7 -1.35 GC YH 
M22 NGC 6656 9.89 -7.55 -8.5 3.0 4.9 -1.49 GC OH 
2MASS-GC01 Hurt 1 10.47 0.10 -6.1 1.5 4.5 -1.20 GC  
NGC 6717 Palomar 9 12.88 -10.90 -5.7 1.4 2.4 -1.09 GC OH 
Palomar 8  14.10 -6.80 -5.5 2.1 5.6 -0.48 GC BD 
GLIMPSE-C02  14.14 -0.64 3.0 -0.33 GC  
M10 NGC 6254 15.14 23.08 -7.5 2.3 4.6 -1.25 GC OH 
M12 NGC 6218 15.72 26.31 -7.3 3.1 4.5 -1.14 GC OH 
IC 1257  16.53 15.15 -6.2 3.2 17.9 -1.70 GC OH 
NGC 6366  18.41 16.04 -5.8 2.8 5.0 -0.73 GC OH 
Palomar 15  18.87 24.30 -5.5 15.7 37.9 -1.90 GC OH FLS
Sgr II Laevens 5 18.9 -22.9 -5.2 38 60 -2.2 UFD  Sgr?
NGC 6517  19.23 6.76 -8.3 2.0 4.3 -1.37 GC OH 
M75 NGC 6864 20.30 -25.75 -8.5 2.8 14.8 -1.03 GC OH FLS
NGC 6539  20.80 6.78 -8.3 4.1 3.1 -0.66 GC BD 
M14 NGC 6402 21.32 14.81 -9.1 3.5 4.1 -1.39 GC OH 
IC 1276 Palomar 7 21.83 5.67 -6.7 3.7 3.7 -0.73 GC BD 
Pfleiderer 2  22.28 9.32 -2.5 9.7 0.0 GC BD 
NGC 6712  25.35 -4.32 -7.5 2.8 3.5 -0.94 GC OH (R)
NGC 6535  27.18 10.44 -4.7 1.5 3.9 -1.51 GC OH 
M30 NGC 7099 27.18 -46.83 -7.4 2.7 7.1 -1.92 GC OH (R)
Boö III  27.39 55.43 -5.8 170 44.0 -2.1 UFD  
NGC 6426  28.09 16.23 -6.7 5.8 14.6 -2.11 GC YH FLS
Her I  28.73 36.87 -6.6 330 134.2 -2.41 UFD  
Palomar 14 AvdB 28.75 42.18 -4.7 24.7 69.0 -1.36 GC YH FLS
Palomar 12  30.51 -47.68 -4.5 7.1 15.9 -0.83 GC YH Sgr
GLIMPSE-C01  31.30 -0.10 -5.9 0.6 2.0 -1.61 GC  
Palomar 11  31.81 -15.58 -6.9 5.6 7.9 -0.39 GC BD 
M72 NGC 6981 35.16 -32.68 -7.0 4.4 12.9 -1.21 GC YH 
NGC 6760  36.11 -3.92 -7.9 4.7 4.8 -0.52 GC BD 
NGC 6749  36.20 -2.20 -6.7 2.5 5.0 -1.60 GC OH 
NGC 5466  42.15 73.59 -7.0 10.4 16.2 -2.20 GC YH (R)
M3 NGC 5272 42.21 78.71 -8.9 3.4 12.2 -1.34 GC YH 
NGC 6934  52.10 -18.89 -7.5 2.7 12.8 -1.32 GC YH (R)
Palomar 10  52.44 2.72 -5.8 1.7 6.4 -0.10 GC BD 
M2 NGC 7089 53.38 -35.78 -9.0 3.1 10.4 -1.31 GC OH (R)
NGC 7492  53.39 -63.48 -5.8 9.2 24.9 -1.41 GC OH 
Aqr II  55.11 -53.01 -4.4 159 -2.3 UFD  
M71 NGC 6838 56.74 -4.56 -5.6 1.9 6.7 -0.73 GC BD 
M13 NGC 6205 59.01 40.91 -8.7 3.3 8.7 -1.33 GC OH (R)
M56 NGC 6779 62.66 8.34 -7.4 3.4 9.7 -2.00 GC OH (R)
Laevens 3  63.6 -21.2 -4.4 7 64 -1.9 GC YH 
NGC 7006  63.77 -19.41 -7.7 4.6 38.8 -1.63 GC YH 
M15 NGC 7078 65.01 -27.31 -9.2 3.2 10.4 -2.02 GC YH 
M92 NGC 6341 68.34 34.86 -8.2 2.6 9.6 -2.16 GC OH 
Kim 1  68.51 -38.43 0.3 6.0 -1.7 GC  
Segue III  69.4 -21.27 -1.2 3.0 -0.8 GC YH 
Peg III  69.85 -41.81 -3.4 78 -2.1 UFD  
NGC 6229  73.64 40.31 -8.0 3.3 29.7 -1.43 GC YH 
CVn I  74.31 79.82 -8.6 564 219.8 -1.98 dSph  FLS
Balbinot 1  75.18 -32.64 -1.2 7.2 -1.58 GC OH 
Psc II  79.21 -47.11 -5.0 60 180 UFD  
Dra I DDO 208 86.37 34.72 -8.8 196 82 -1.93 dSph pec  Mag
Palomar 13  87.10 -42.70 -3.7 3.5 26.7 -1.74 GC YH Mag (R)
Dra II Laevens 4 98.3 42.9 -2.9 19 22 -2.2 GC/UFD  
UMi I DDO 199 104.97 44.80 -8.9 280 68.0 -2.13 dSph  Mag
Muñoz 1  105.44 45.48 -0.4 7.1 -1.5 GC  
CVn II  113.58 82.70 -4.9 74 150.7 -2.21 UFD  FLS
Palomar 1  130.07 19.03 -2.5 2.2 17.0 -0.70 GC BD CMa?
Gaia II  132.15 -8.74 -2.0 3 -1.0 GC  
Tri II Laevens 2 141.4 -23.4 -1.8 34 36 -2.2 GC/UFD  TriAnd?
Segue II  149.4 -38.1 -2.5 34 38.0 -2.0 GC/UFD  Sgr? TriAnd?
NGC 288  152.28 -89.38 -6.7 5.7 12.0 -1.14 GC OH (R)
UMa II  152.46 37.44 -4.2 140 36.5 -2.47 UFD  
Cet II  156.48 -78.53 0.0 17 GC/UFD  
Willman 1  158.58 56.78 -2.7 25 43 GC/UFD  
UMa I  159.43 54.41 -5.5 318 104.9 -2.18 UFD  
Whiting 1  161.62 -60.64 -2.5 1.6 49.0 -0.65 GC  Sgr
Cet III  163.81 -61.13 -2.5 90 -2.2 UFD  
Palomar 2  170.53 -9.07 -8.0 5.4 35.4 -1.30 GC YH Sgr?
NGC 2419  180.37 25.24 -9.6 17.9 91.5 -2.14 GC OH (N)
Koposov 2  195.11 25.55 -0.4 1.8 26.3 -0.6 GC YH Sgr?
Palomar 4  202.31 71.80 -3.1 17.2 111.8 -1.07 GC YH FLS
Leo T  214.85 43.66 -8.0 178 425 -1.99 UFD  
Eri I  218.11 -41.33 -5.1 10.5 95.2 -1.20 GC YH FLS
Leo II DDO 93 220.17 67.23 -9.8 151 208 -1.62 dSph pec  FLS
Segue I  220.5 50.4 -1.5 29 25 GC/UFD  FLS? Sgr?
Hya I  224.7 29.1 -2.5 -0.91 GC/UFD  CMa?
Leo I DDO 74 225.99 49.11 -12.0 246 254 -1.43 dSph  FLS
M79 NGC 1904 227.23 -29.35 -7.9 3.0 18.8 -1.37 GC OH CMa
Gaia I  227.34 -8.75 -5.1 9 -0.7 GC YH 
Col I  231.62 -28.88 -4.5 103 UFD  
For I ESO 356-4 237.10 -65.65 -13.4 668 140 -0.99 dSph  FLS Mag?
CMa I  239.99 -8.00 -8.3 8.0 dIrr  CMa
Palomar 3  240.14 41.86 -5.7 17.8 95.9 -1.39 GC YH FLS
Com I  241.9 83.6 -4.1 77 45.2 -2.6 UFD  FLS Sgr?
Sex I  243.50 42.27 -9.3 682 89 -1.93 dSph  FLS
NGC 1851  244.51 -35.04 -8.3 1.8 16.7 -1.03 GC OH CMa
NGC 2298  245.63 -16.01 -6.3 2.4 15.7 -1.71 GC OH CMa
Eri II  249.78 -51.65 -7.1 172 -1.5 UFD  Mag?
NGC 4147  252.85 77.19 -6.2 2.4 21.3 -1.5 GC YH Sgr?
Pic I  257.30 -40.65 -3.7 31 -1.7 GC/UFD  Mag??
AM 1 E1 258.36 -48.47 -4.73 15.2 124.6 -1.70 GC YH FLS
Car I  260.11 -22.22 -9.1 241 103 -2.0 dSph  Mag
Koposov 1  260.98 70.76 -4.3 3.0 36.3 -0.6 GC YH Sgr?
Pyxis  261.32 7.00 -5.7 15.6 41.7 -1.30 GC YH 
Leo V  261.86 58.54 -5.2 42 180.8 UFD  FLS?
Hor II  262.47 -54.14 -2.6 47 -2.1 UFD  Mag?
Leo IV  265.44 56.51 -5.8 116 160.6 -2.54 UFD  FLS
Ret II  266.30 -49.74 -3.6 32 -1.8 GC/UFD  Mag?
Pic II  269.63 -24.05 -3.2 46 -1.8 UFD  Mag?
Car II  269.98 -17.14 -4.5 91 -2.44 UFD  Mag?
Car III  270.01 -16.85 -2.4 30 -1.97 GC/UFD  Mag?
NGC 1261  270.54 -52.13 -7.8 3.6 18.2 -1.08 GC YH FLS
Hor I  271.39 -54.73 -3.5 30 -1.6 GC/UFD  Mag?
Phe I ESO 245-7 272.16 -68.95 -9.8 445 -1.9 IAm V-VI  
Ret III  273.88 -45.65 -3.3 64 UFD  Mag??
Laevens 1 Crt I 274.8 47.8 -5.3 19.4 145 -1.9 GC YH 
Eri III  274.96 -59.60 -2.4 18 GC/UFD  Mag?
Vir I  276.94 59.58 -0.3 47 -2.2 UFD  
NGC 3201  277.23 8.64 -7.5 3.9 8.9 -1.24 GC YH (R)
LMC  280.47 -32.89 -18.5 3000 50 -0.6 SBm V  Mag
NGC 2808  282.19 -11.25 -9.4 2.1 11.1 -1.11 GC OH CMa (N)
Crt II  282.91 42.03 -8.2 1066 -1.7 dSph  FLS
Scl I  287.54 -83.16 -11.1 260 79 -1.68 dSph  FLS
E 3  292.27 -19.02 -2.8 2.6 7.6 -0.83 GC  
Hya II  295.61 30.46 -4.8 68 128 -2.2 UFD  Mag?
M68 NGC 4590 299.63 36.05 -7.3 4.6 10.1 -2.06 GC YH CMa?
Rup 106  300.89 11.67 -6.3 6.8 18.5 -1.49 GC YH CMa?
NGC 4372  300.99 -9.88 -7.8 6.6 7.1 -1.88 GC OH 
NGC 362  301.53 -46.25 -8.4 2.0 9.4 -1.09 GC YH (R)
SMC NGC 292 302.80 -44.30 -16.8 1000 57 -1.2 SBm V pec  Mag
NGC 4833  303.61 -8.01 -8.2 4.6 7.0 -1.71 GC OH 
NGC 104 47 Tuc 305.90 -44.89 -9.4 3.7 7.4 -0.78 GC BD 
IC 4499  307.35 -20.47 -7.3 8.3 15.7 -1.60 GC YH 
NGC 5139 Omega Cen 309.10 14.97 -10.3 6.4 6.4 -1.35 GC  (N) (R)
DES 1  310.52 -67.83 -3.05 9.8 -1.98 GC YH 
NGC 5286  311.61 10.57 -8.6 2.2 8.4 -1.41 GC OH 
Tuc IV  313.29 -55.29 -3.5 127 -2.3 UFD  Mag?
Tuc III  315.15 -56.19 -2.4 44 -2.3 UFD  Mag??
Tuc V  316.31 -51.89 -1.6 17 -1.8 GC/UFD  Mag?
NGC 6101  317.75 -15.82 -6.9 7.6 11.1 -1.76 GC OH 
AM 4  320.15 33.54 -1.6 3.7 25.5 -0.97 GC  Sgr?
Phe II  323.69 -59.75 -3.7 27 GC/UFD  Mag?
NGC 6362  325.55 -17.57 -6.9 4.8 5.1 -0.99 GC OH 
NGC 5927  326.60 4.86 -7.8 2.5 4.5 -0.64 GC BD 
NGC 5946  327.58 4.19 -7.2 2.1 5.8 -1.22 GC OH 
Tuc II  328.08 -52.33 -3.9 199 UFD  Mag?
BH 176  328.41 4.34 -4.3 3.9 9.7 -0.13 GC BD 
Lynga 7 BH 184 328.77 -2.79 -6.4 2.3 4.2 -0.64 GC BD 
FSR 1716  329.78 -1.59 -1.5 3.5 4.3 -1.5 GC OH 
NGC 5694  331.06 30.36 -7.8 3.3 29.1 -1.74 GC OH 
NGC 5824  332.55 22.07 -8.8 3.4 25.8 -1.60 GC OH 
M53 NGC 5024 332.96 79.76 -8.7 5.8 18.3 -1.86 GC OH FLS
NGC 5053  335.69 78.94 -6.7 16.7 16.9 -1.98 GC YH FLS Sgr?
NGC 6752  336.49 -25.63 -7.7 2.7 5.2 -1.24 GC OH 
NGC 5986  337.02 13.27 -8.4 3.2 4.8 -1.35 GC OH 
NGC 6397  338.17 -11.96 -6.6 1.6 6.0 -1.76 GC OH 
Gru I  338.68 -58.24 -3.4 70 UFD  Mag??
FSR 1735  339.19 -1.85 -6.5 0.8 2 GC  
NGC 6352  341.42 -7.17 -6.5 3.3 3.3 -0.70 GC BD 
NGC 6584  342.14 -16.41 -7.7 3.1 7.0 -1.30 GC YH 
NGC 5634  342.21 49.26 -7.7 4.0 21.2 -1.94 GC OH Sgr
NGC 6139  342.37 6.94 -8.4 2.4 3.6 -1.68 GC OH 
NGC 5897  342.95 30.29 -7.2 7.6 7.3 -1.73 GC OH 
Terzan 3  345.08 9.19 -4.6 2.8 2.4 -0.73 GC BD 
NGC 6388  345.56 -6.74 -9.4 2.0 3.2 -0.60 GC BD 
ESO280-SC06  346.90 -12.57 -4.9 6.3 14.3 -2.00 GC  
Kim 2  347.17 -42.07 -1.5 12.8 99.4 -1.0 GC YH 
NGC 6256  347.79 3.31 -6.5 2.1 1.8 -0.70 GC BD 
NGC 6496  348.02 -10.01 -7.2 6.3 4.3 -0.70 GC BD 
NGC 6541  349.48 -11.09 -8.4 2.4 2.2 -1.53 GC OH 
NGC 6380 Ton 1 350.18 -3.42 -7.5 2.3 3.2 -0.50 GC BD 
Ton 2 Pismis 26 350.80 -3.42 -6.1 2.5 1.4 -0.50 GC BD 
M4 NGC 6121 350.97 15.97 -7.2 2.3 5.9 -1.05 GC OH (R)
Gru II  351.15 -51.94 -3.9 93 -2.0 UFD  Mag??
ESO452-SC11 1636-283 351.91 12.10 -4.0 1.3 2.0 -1.50 GC YH 
NGC 6144  351.93 15.70 -6.7 4.0 2.6 -1.56 GC OH (R)
FSR 1767  352.61 -2.18 -4.7 7.0 GC  
M80 NGC 6093 352.67 19.46 -8.2 1.9 3.8 -1.47 GC OH 
NGC 6441  353.53 -5.01 -9.6 2.2 3.9 -0.60 GC BD 
M62 NGC 6266 353.57 7.32 -9.2 2.5 1.7 -1.02 GC OH 
Boö II  353.7 68.9 -2.7 51 47.6 -2.0 UFD  Sgr?
Ind I  353.99 -37.40 -4.3 181 -2.0 UFD  
Liller 1  354.84 -0.16 -7.6 1.3 1.8 0.22 GC BD 
NGC 6453  355.72 -3.87 -6.9 1.0 1.8 -1.53 GC OH 
NGC 6304  355.83 5.38 -7.3 2.5 2.2 -0.66 GC BD 
Terzan 4 HP 4 356.02 1.31 -6.1 0.6 1.3 -1.60 GC OH 
Terzan 2 HP 3 356.32 2.30 -5.3 3.9 0.9 -0.40 GC BD 
Djorg 1  356.67 -2.48 -6.3 4.4 4.1 -2.00 GC  
M19 NGC 6273 356.87 9.38 -9.2 3.1 1.6 -1.53 GC OH 
NGC 6316  357.18 5.76 -8.3 2.3 3.2 -0.55 GC BD (R)
HP 1 BH 229 357.42 2.12 -6.4 6.2 6.1 -1.55 GC OH 
Terzan 1 HP 2 357.56 0.99 -4.9 6.2 2.5 -1.30 GC YH 
NGC 6293  357.62 7.83 -7.8 2.3 1.4 -1.92 GC OH 
Boö I  358.08 69.62 -6.3 242 57.6 -2.5 UFD  
NGC 6284  358.35 9.94 -8.0 3.5 7.6 -1.13 GC OH 
Terzan 6 HP 5 358.57 -2.16 -7.7 1.2 1.6 -0.50 GC BD 
NGC 6235  358.92 13.52 -6.4 2.8 4.1 -1.18 GC OH 
VVV CL002  359.56 0.89 -3.4 1.6 0.6 -0.4 GC  
NGC 6355  359.58 5.43 -8.1 2.4 1.8 -1.50 GC OH  (1) Population (Mackey, van den Bergh 2005):
BD = Bulge and Disk
OH = Old Halo
YH = Young Halo (2) Stream (Forbes, Bridges 2010):
Mag = Magellanic Stream
Sgr = Sagittarius Stream
CMa = Canis Major (Monoceros) Stream
FLS = Fornax-Leo-Sculptor Great Circle (R) = Retrograde Orbit
(N) = Suspected dwarf galaxy Nucleus

Links & References
Older versions of the chart
Milky Way Globular Clusters and Satellite Galaxies (SEDS)
Catalog of Local Volume Galaxies
W.E. Harris (2003) Catalog of Parameters for Milky Way Globular Clusters
Mike Irwin List of Local Group members

Zinn (1993) The Galactic Halo Cluster Systems: Evidence for Accretion, in Smith G. H., Brodie J. P., eds., ASP Conf. Ser. 48
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Mackey, van den Bergh (2005) The properties of Globular Cluster subsystems. arXiv:astro-ph/0504.4142
Martínez-Delgado (2006) Tracing Stellar Tidal Streams in the Galactic Halo. [PDF]
Grillmayr (2008) Four new stellar debris streams in the Galactic Halo. arXiv:astro-ph/0811.3965v1
Catelan (2009) Horizontal Branch Stars: The Interplay between Observations and Theory, and Insights into the Formation of the Galaxy. arXiv:astro-ph/0507.464v2
Forbes, Bridges (2010) Accreted versus In Situ Milky Way Globular Clusters. arXiv:astro-ph/1001.4289v1
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Laevens et al. (2015) A new faint Milky Way satellite discovered in the Pan-Starrs1 3pi survey. arXiv:astro-ph/1503.05554v1
Martin et al. (2015) Hydra II: A faint and compact Milky Way dwarf galaxy found in the survey of the Magellanic stellar history. arXiv:astro-ph/1503.06216v2
Laevens et al. (2015) Sagittarius II, Draco II and Laevens 3: Three new Milky Way satellites discovered in the Pan-Starrs1 3pi survey. arXiv:astro-ph/1507.07564v1
Luque et al. (2015) Digging deeper into the Southern skies: A compact Milky-Way companion discovered in first-year Dark Energy Survey data. arXiv:astro-ph/1508.02381v1
Drlica-Wagner et al. (2015) Eight Ultra-faint Galaxy candidates discovered in year two of the Dark Energy Survey. arXiv:astro-ph/1508.03622v1
Torrealba et al. (2016) The feeble giant. Discovery of a large and diffuse Milky Way dwarf galaxy in the constellation of Crater. arXiv:astro-ph/1601.07178v3
Torrealba et al. (2016) At the survey limits: discovery of the Aquarius 2 dwarf galaxy in the VST ATLAS and the SDSS data. arXiv:astro-ph/1605.05338v2
Drlica-Wagner et al. (2016) An Ultra-faint Galaxy Candidate discovered in early data from the Magellanic Satellites Survey. arXiv:astro-ph/1609.03148v2
Koposov et al. (2017) Gaia 1 and 2. A pair of new satellites of the Galaxy. arXiv:astro-ph/1702.01122
Homma et al. (2017) Searches for New Milky Way Satellites from the First Two Years of Data of the Subaru/Hyper Suprime-Cam Survey: Discovery of Cetus III. arXiv:astro-ph/1703.05977v2
Torrealba et al. (2018) Discovery of two neighboring satellites in the Carina constellation with MagLiteS. arXiv:astro-ph/1801.07279v1