Table 2. Catch-up immunization schedule for persons aged 4 months–18 years who start late or who are more than 1 month behind, United States, 2019


Always make recommendations by determining needed vaccines based on age (Table 1), determining appropriate intervals for catch-up, if needed (Table 2), assessing for medical indications (Table 3), and reviewing special situations (Notes).

The tables below provide catch-up schedules and minimum intervals between doses for children whose vaccinations have been delayed. A vaccine series does not need to be restarted, regardless of the time that has elapsed between doses. Use the section appropriate for the child’s age.

Vaccine Catch-Up Guidance

CDC has developed catch-up guidance job aids to assist health care providers in interpreting Table 2 in the childhood and adolescent immunization schedule.

Children Age 4 Months through 6 Years

Vaccine Minimum Age for Dose 1 Minimum Interval Between Doses
Dose
1 to Dose 2
Dose
2 to Dose 3
Dose
3 to Dose 4
Dose
4 to Dose 5
Hepatitis B more info icon. Birth 4 weeks 8 weeks and at least 16 weeks after first dose. Minimum age for the final dose is 24 weeks.
Rotavirus more info icon. 6 weeks Maximum age for first dose is 14 weeks, 6 days. 4 weeks 4 weeks
Maximum age for final dose is 8 months, 0 days.
Diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis more info icon. 6 weeks 4 weeks 4 weeks 6 months 6 months
Haemophilus influenzae type b more info icon. 6 weeks No further doses needed if first dose was administered at age 15 months or older.
4 weeks
if first dose was administered before the 1st birthday.
8 weeks (as final dose)
if first dose was administered at age 12 through 14 months.
No further doses needed if previous dose was administered at age 15 months or older.
4 weeks
if current age is younger than 12 months and first dose was administered at younger than age 7 months,
and at least 1 previous dose was PRP-T (ActHib, Pentacel, Hiberix) or unknown.
8 weeks and age 12 through 59 months (as final dose)
if current age is younger than 12 months and first dose was administered at age 7 through 11 months; OR

if current age is 12 through 59 months and first dose was administered before the 1st birthday, and second dose administered at younger than 15 months;

OR

if both doses were PRP-OMP (PedvaxHIB; Comvax) and were administered before the 1st birthday.

8 weeks (as final dose) This dose only necessary for children age 12 through

59 months who received 3 doses before the 1st birthday.

Pneumococcal conjugate more info icon. 6 weeks No further doses needed for healthy children if first dose was administered at age 24 months or older.

4 weeks

if first dose administered before the

1st birthday.


8 weeks (as final dose for healthy
children)
if first dose was administered at the

1st birthday or after.

No further doses needed for healthy children if previous dose administered at age 24 months or older.
4 weeks if current age is younger than 12 months and previous dose given at <7 months old.

8 weeks (as final dose for healthy children)

if previous dose given between 7-11 months (wait until at least 12 months old); OR

if current age is 12 months or older and at least 1 dose was given before age 12 months.

8 weeks (as final dose)
This dose only necessary for children age 12 through 59 months who received
3 doses before age 12 months or for children at high risk who received 3 doses at any age.
Inactivated poliovirus more info icon. 6 weeks 4 weeks 4 weeks if current age is < 4 years.

6 months (as final dose) if current age is 4 years or older.

6 months (minimum age 4 years for final dose).
Measles, mumps, rubella more info icon. 12 months 4 weeks
Varicella more info icon. 12 months 3 months
Hepatitis A more info icon. 12 months 6 months
Meningococcal more info icon. 2 months MenACWY- CRM
9 months MenACWY-D
8 weeks See notes See notes

Top of Page

Children and Adolescents Age 7 through 18 Years

Vaccine Minimum Age for Dose 1 Minimum Interval Between Doses
Dose
1 to Dose 2
Dose
2 to Dose 3
Dose
3 to Dose 4
Meningococcal more info icon. Not Applicable (N/A) 8 weeks
Tetanus, diphtheria; tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis more info icon. 7 years 4 weeks 4 weeks
if first dose of DTaP/DT was administered before the 1st birthday.
6 months (as final dose)
if first dose of DTaP/DT or Tdap/Td was administered at or after the 1st birthday.
6 months if first dose of DTaP/DT was administered before the 1st birthday.
Human papillomavirus more info icon. 9 years Routine dosing intervals are recommended.
Hepatitis A more info icon. N/A 6 months
Hepatitis B more info icon. N/A 4 weeks 8 weeks and at least 16 weeks after first dose.
Inactivated poliovirus more info icon. N/A 4 weeks 6 months
A fourth dose is not necessary if the third dose was administered at age 4 years or older and at least 6 months after the previous dose.
A fourth dose of IPV is indicated if all previous doses were administered at <4 years or if the third dose was administered <6 months after the second dose.
Measles, mumps, rubella more info icon. N/A 4 weeks
Varicella more info icon. N/A 3 months if younger than age 13 years.
4 weeks if age 13 years or older.

Notes

Recommended Child and Adolescent Schedule for ages 18 years or younger, United States, 2019

For vaccine recommendations for persons 19 years of age and older, see the Recommended Adult Immunization Schedule.

Additional information

  • Consult relevant ACIP statements for detailed recommendations.
  • For information on contraindications and precautions for the use of a vaccine, consult the General Best Practice Guidelines for Immunization and relevant ACIP statements.
  • For calculating intervals between doses, 4 weeks = 28 days. Intervals of ≥4 months are determined by calendar months.
  • Within a number range (e.g., 12–18), a dash (–) should be read as “through.”
  • Vaccine doses administered ≤4 days before the minimum age or interval are considered valid. Doses of any vaccine administered ≥5 days earlier than the minimum age or minimum interval should not be counted as valid and should be repeated as age-appropriate. The repeat dose should be spaced after the invalid dose by the recommended minimum interval. For further details, see Table 3-1, Recommended and minimum ages and intervals between vaccine doses, in General Best Practice Guidelines for Immunization.
  • Information on travel vaccine requirements and recommendations is available at wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/.
  • For vaccination of persons with immunodeficiencies, see Table 8-1, Vaccination of persons with primary and secondary immunodeficiencies, in General Best Practice Guidelines for Immunization, and Immunization in Special Clinical Circumstances (In: Kimberlin DW, Brady MT, Jackson MA, Long SS, eds. Red Book: 2015 report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases. 31st ed. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 2018:67–111).
  • For information regarding vaccination in the setting of a vaccine-preventable disease outbreak, contact your state or local health department.
  • The National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP) is a no-fault alternative to the traditional legal system for resolving vaccine injury claims. All routine child and adolescent vaccines are covered by VICP except for pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23). For more information, see www.hrsa.gov/vaccinecompensation/index.htmlExternal .

Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (DTaP) vaccination (minimum age: 6 weeks [4 years for Kinrix or Quadracel])

Routine vaccination

  • 5-dose series at 2, 4, 6, 15–18 months, 4–6 years
    • Prospectively: Dose 4 may be given as early as age
      12 months if at least 6 months have elapsed since dose 3.
    • Retrospectively: A 4th dose that was inadvertently given as early as 12 months may be counted if at least 4 months have elapsed since dose 3.

Catch-up vaccination

  • Dose 5 is not necessary if dose 4 was administered at age 4 years or older.
  • For other catch-up guidance, see Table 2.

Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccination
(minimum age: 6 weeks)

Routine vaccination

  •  ActHIB, Hiberix, or Pentacel: 4-dose series at 2, 4, 6, 12–15 months
  •  PedvaxHIB: 3-dose series at 2, 4, 12–15 months

Catch-up vaccination

  • Dose 1 at 7–11 months: Administer dose 2 at least 4 weeks later and dose 3 (final dose) at 12–15 months or 8 weeks after dose 2 (whichever is later).
  • Dose 1 at 12–14 months: Administer dose 2 (final dose) at least 8 weeks after dose 1.
  • Dose 1 before 12 months and dose 2 before 15 months: Administer dose 3 (final dose) 8 weeks after dose 2.
  • 2 doses of PedvaxHIB before 12 months: Administer dose 3 (final dose) at 12–59 months and at least 8 weeks after dose 2.
  • Unvaccinated at 15–59 months: 1 dose
  • For other catch-up guidance, see Table 2.

Special situations

  • Chemotherapy or radiation treatment:
    • Unvaccinated or only 1 dose before age 12 months: 2 doses, 8 weeks apart
    • 2 or more doses before age 12 months: 1 dose at least 8 weeks after previous dose

    Doses administered within 14 days of starting therapy or during therapy should be repeated at least 3 months after therapy completion.

  • Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT):
    • 3-dose series 4 weeks apart starting 6 to 12 months after successful transplant regardless of Hib vaccination history
  • Anatomic or functional asplenia (including sickle cell disease):
    • Unvaccinated or only 1 dose before 12 months: 2 doses, 8 weeks apart
    • 2 or more doses before 12 months: 1 dose at least 8 weeks after previous dose
    Unvaccinated* persons age 5 years or older
  • Elective splenectomy:
    Unvaccinated* persons age 15 months or older
    • 1 dose (preferably at least 14 days before procedure)
  • HIV infection:
    • Unvaccinated or only 1 dose before age 12 months: 2 doses, 8 weeks apart
    • 2 or more doses before age 12 months: 1 dose at least 8 weeks after previous dose
    Unvaccinated* persons age 5–18 years
  • Immunoglobulin deficiency, early component complement deficiency:
    • Unvaccinated or only 1 dose before age 12 months: 2 doses, 8 weeks apart
    • 2 or more doses before age 12 months: 1 dose at least 8 weeks after previous dose

*Unvaccinated = Less than routine series (through 14 months) OR no doses (14 months or older)

Hepatitis A vaccination
(minimum age: 12 months for routine vaccination)

Routine vaccination

  •  2-dose series (Havrix 6–12 months apart or Vaqta 6–18 months apart, minimum interval 6 months); a series begun before the 2nd birthday should be completed even if the child turns 2 before the second dose is administered.

Catch-up vaccination

  • Anyone 2 years of age or older may receive HepA vaccine if desired. Minimum interval between doses: 6 months
  • Adolescents 18 years and older may receive the combined HepA and HepB vaccine, Twinrix, as a 3-dose series (0, 1, and 6 months) or 4-dose series (0, 7, and 21–30 days, followed by a dose at 12 months).

International travel

  • Persons traveling to or working in countries with high or intermediate endemic hepatitis A:
    • Infants age 6–11 months: 1 dose before departure; revaccinate with 2 doses, separated by 6–18 months, between 12 to 23 months of age
    • Unvaccinated age 12 months and older: 1st dose as soon as travel considered

Special situations

At risk for hepatitis A infection: 2-dose series as above

  • Chronic liver disease
  • Clotting factor disorders
  • Men who have sex with men
  • Injection or non-injection drug use
  • Homelessness
  • Work with hepatitis A virus in research laboratory or nonhuman primates with hepatitis A infection
  • Travel in countries with high or intermediate endemic hepatitis A
  • Close, personal contact with international adoptee (e.g., household or regular babysitting) in first 60 days after arrival from country with high or intermediate endemic hepatitis A (administer dose 1 as soon as adoption is planned, at least 2 weeks before adoptee’s arrival)

Hepatitis B vaccination (minimum age: birth)

Birth dose (monovalent HepB vaccine only)

  • Mother is HBsAg-negative: 1 dose within 24 hours of birth for all medically stable infants ≥2,000 grams. Infants
    ≤2,000 grams: administer 1 dose at chronological age 1 month or hospital discharge.
  • Mother is HBsAg-positive:
    • Administer HepB vaccine and 0.5 mL of hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG) (at separate anatomic sites) within 12 hours of birth, regardless of birth weight. For infants ≤2,000 grams, administer 3 additional doses of vaccine (total of 4 doses) beginning at age 1 month.
    • Test for HBsAg and anti-HBs at age 9–12 months. If HepB series is delayed, test 1–2 months after final dose.
  • Mother’s HBsAg status is unknown:
    • Administer HepB vaccine within 12 hours of birth, regardless of birth weight.
    • For infants ≤2,000 grams, administer 0.5 mL of HBIG in addition to HepB vaccine within 12 hours of birth. Administer 3 additional doses of vaccine (total of 4 doses) beginning at age 1 month.
    • Determine mother’s HBsAg status as soon as possible. If mother is HBsAg-positive, administer 0.5 mL of HBIG to infants ≥2,000 grams as soon as possible, but no later than 7 days of age.

Routine series

  • 3-dose series at 0, 1–2, 6–18 months (use monovalent HepB vaccine for doses administered before age 6 weeks)
  • Infants who did not receive a birth dose should begin the series as soon as feasible (see Table 2).
  • Administration of 4 doses is permitted when a combination vaccine containing HepB is used after the birth dose.
  • Minimum age for the final (3rd or 4th ) dose: 24 weeks
  • Minimum intervals: dose 1 to dose 2: 4 weeks / dose 2 to dose 3: 8 weeks / dose 1 to dose 3: 16 weeks (when 4 doses are administered, substitute “dose 4” for “dose 3” in these calculations)

Catch-up vaccination

  • Unvaccinated persons should complete a 3-dose series at 0, 1–2, 6 months.
  • Adolescents age 11–15 years may use an alternative 2-dose schedule with at least 4 months between doses (adult formulation Recombivax HB only).
  • Adolescents 18 years and older may receive a 2-dose series of HepB (Heplisav-B) at least 4 weeks apart.
  • Adolescents 18 years and older may receive the combined HepA and HepB vaccine, Twinrix, as a 3-dose series (0, 1, and 6 months) or 4-dose series (0, 7, and 21–30 days, followed by a dose at 12 months).
  • For other catch-up guidance, see Table 2.

Human papillomavirus vaccination (minimum age: 9 years)

Routine and catch-up vaccination

  • HPV vaccination routinely recommended for all adolescents age 11–12 years (can start at age 9 years) and through age 18 years if not previously adequately vaccinated
  • 2- or 3-dose series depending on age at initial vaccination:
    • Age 9 through 14 years at initial vaccination: 2-dose series at 0, 6–12 months (minimum interval: 5 months; repeat dose if administered too soon)
    • Age 15 years or older at initial vaccination: 3-dose series at 0, 1–2 months, 6 months (minimum intervals: dose 1 to dose 2: 4 weeks / dose 2 to dose 3: 12 weeks / dose 1 to dose 3: 5 months; repeat dose if administered too soon)
  • If completed valid vaccination series with any HPV vaccine, no additional doses needed

Special situations

  • Immunocompromising conditions, including HIV infection: 3-dose series as above
  • History of sexual abuse or assault: Start at age 9 years
  • Pregnancy: HPV vaccination not recommended until after pregnancy; no intervention needed if vaccinated while pregnant; pregnancy testing not needed before vaccination

Inactivated poliovirus vaccination (minimum age: 6 weeks)

Routine vaccination

  • 4-dose series at ages 2, 4, 6–18 months, 4–6 years; administer the final dose on or after the 4th birthday and at least 6 months after the previous dose.
  • 4 or more doses of IPV can be administered before the 4th birthday when a combination vaccine containing IPV is used. However, a dose is still recommended after the 4th birthday and at least 6 months after the previous dose.

Catch-up vaccination

  • In the first 6 months of life, use minimum ages and intervals only for travel to a polio-endemic region or during an outbreak.
  • IPV is not routinely recommended for U.S. residents 18 years and older.

Series containing oral polio vaccine (OPV), either mixed OPV- IPV or OPV-only series:

Influenza vaccination (minimum age: 6 months [IIV], 2 years [LAIV], 18 years [RIV])

Routine vaccination

  • 1 dose any influenza vaccine appropriate for age and health status annually (2 doses separated by at least 4 weeks for children 6 months–8 years who did not receive at least 2 doses of influenza vaccine before July 1, 2018)

Special situations

  • Egg allergy, hives only: Any influenza vaccine appropriate for age and health status annually
  • Egg allergy more severe than hives (e.g., angioedema, respiratory distress): Any influenza vaccine appropriate for age and health status annually in medical setting under supervision of health care provider who can recognize and manage severe allergic conditions
  • LAIV should not be used for those with a history of severe allergic reaction to any component of the vaccine (excluding egg) or to a previous dose of any influenza vaccine, children and adolescents receiving concomitant aspirin or salicylate-containing medications, children age 2 through 4 years with a history of asthma or wheezing, those who are immunocompromised due to any cause (including immunosuppression caused by medications and HIV infection), anatomic and functional asplenia, cochlear implants, cerebrospinal fluid-oropharyngeal communication, close contacts and caregivers of severely immunosuppressed persons who require a protected environment, pregnancy, and persons who have received influenza antiviral medications within the previous 48 hours.

Measles, mumps, and rubella vaccination (minimum age: 12 months for routine vaccination)

Routine vaccination

  • 2-dose series at 12–15 months, 4–6 years
  • Dose 2 may be administered as early as 4 weeks after dose 1.

Catch-up vaccination

  • Unvaccinated children and adolescents: 2 doses at least 4 weeks apart
  • The maximum age for use of MMRV is 12 years.

Special situations

International travel

  • Infants age 6–11 months: 1 dose before departure; revaccinate with 2 doses at 12–15 months (12 months for children in high-risk areas) and dose 2 as early as 4 weeks later.
  • Unvaccinated children age 12 months and older: 2-dose series at least 4 weeks apart before departure

Meningococcal serogroup A,C,W,Y vaccination (minimum age: 2 months [MenACWY-CRM, Menveo], 9 months [MenACWY-D, Menactra])

Routine vaccination

  • 2-dose series: 11–12 years, 16 years

Catch-up vaccination

  • Age 13–15 years: 1 dose now and booster at age 16–18 years (minimum interval: 8 weeks)
  • Age 16–18 years: 1 dose

Special situations

Anatomic or functional asplenia (including sickle cell disease), HIV infection, persistent complement component deficiency, eculizumab use:

  • Menveo
    • Dose 1 at age 8 weeks: 4-dose series at 2, 4, 6, 12 months
    • Dose 1 at age 7–23 months: 2-dose series (dose 2 at least 12 weeks after dose 1 and after the 1st birthday)
    • Dose 1 at age 24 months or older: 2-dose series at least 8 weeks apart
  • Menactra
    • Persistent complement component deficiency:
      • Age 9–23 months: 2 doses at least 12 weeks apart
      • Age 24 months or older: 2 doses at least 8 weeks apart
    • Anatomic or functional asplenia, sickle cell disease, or HIV infection:
      • Age 9–23 months: Not recommended
      • 24 months or older: 2 doses at least 8 weeks apart
      • Menactra must be administered at least 4 weeks after completion of PCV13 series.

Travel in countries with hyperendemic or epidemic meningococcal disease, including countries in the African meningitis belt or during the Hajj:

  • Children age less than 24 months:
    • Menveo (age 2–23 months):
      • Dose 1 at 8 weeks: 4-dose series at 2, 4, 6, 12 months
      • Dose 1 at 7–23 months: 2-dose series (dose 2 at least 12 weeks after dose 1 and after the 1st birthday)
    • Menactra (age 9–23 months):
      • 2-dose series (dose 2 at least 12 weeks after dose 1; dose 2 may be administered as early as 8 weeks after dose 1 in travelers)
  • Children age 2 years or older: 1 dose Menveo or Menactra

First-year college students who live in residential housing (if not previously vaccinated at age 16 years or older) or military recruits: 1 dose of Menveo or Menactra

Note: Menactra should be administered either before or at the same time as DTaP. For MenACWY booster dose
recommendations for groups listed under “Special situations” above and additional meningococcal vaccination information, see meningococcal MMWR publications.

Meningococcal serogroup B vaccination (minimum age: 10 years [MenB-4C, Bexsero; MenB-FHbp, Trumenba])

Clinical discretion

  • MenB vaccine may be administered based on individual clinical decision to adolescents not at increased risk age 16–23 years (preferred age 16–18 years):
  • Bexsero: 2-dose series at least 1 month apart
  • Trumenba: 2-dose series at least 6 months apart; if dose 2 is administered earlier than 6 months, administer a 3rd dose at least 4 months after dose 2.

Special situations

Anatomic or functional asplenia (including sickle cell disease), persistent complement component deficiency, eculizumab use:

  • Bexsero: 2-dose series at least 1 month apart
  • Trumenba: 3-dose series at 0, 1–2, 6 months

Bexsero and Trumenba are not interchangeable; the same product should be used for all doses in a series.

For additional meningococcal vaccination information, see meningococcal MMWR publications.

Pneumococcal vaccination (minimum age: 6 weeks [PCV13], 2 years [PPSV23])

Routine vaccination with PCV13

  • 4-dose series at 2, 4, 6, 12–15 months

Catch-up vaccination with PCV13

  • 1 dose for healthy children age 24–59 months with any incomplete* PCV13 series
  • For other catch-up guidance, see Table 2.

Special situations

High-risk conditions below: When both PCV13 and PPSV23 are indicated, administer PCV13 first. PCV13 and PPSV23 should not be administered during same visit.

Chronic heart disease (particularly cyanotic congenital heart disease and cardiac failure); chronic lung disease (including asthma treated with high-dose, oral corticosteroids); diabetes mellitus:

  • Any incomplete* series with:
    • 3 PCV13 doses: 1 dose PCV13 (at least 8 weeks after any prior PCV13 dose)
    • Less than 3 PCV13 doses: 2 doses PCV13 (8 weeks after the most recent dose and administered 8 weeks apart)
  • No history of PPSV23: 1 dose PPSV23 (at least 8 weeks after any prior PCV13 dose)
  • No history of PPSV23: 1 dose PPSV23 (at least 8 weeks after any prior PCV13 dose)

Cerebrospinal fluid leak, cochlear implant:

  • Any incomplete* series with:
    • 3 PCV13 doses: 1 dose PCV13 (at least 8 weeks after any prior PCV13 dose)
    • Less than 3 PCV13 doses: 2 doses PCV13, 8 weeks after the most recent dose and administered 8 weeks apart
  • No history of PPSV23: 1 dose PPSV23 (at least 8 weeks after any prior PCV13 dose)
  • No history of either PCV13 or PPSV23: 1 dose PCV13, 1 dose PPSV23 at least 8 weeks later
  • Any PCV13 but no PPSV23: 1 dose PPSV23 at least 8 weeks after the most recent dose of PCV13
  • PPSV23 but no PCV13: 1 dose PCV13 at least 8 weeks after the most recent dose of PPSV23

Sickle cell disease and other hemoglobinopathies; anatomic or functional asplenia; congenital or acquired immunodeficiency; HIV infection; chronic renal failure; nephrotic syndrome; malignant neoplasms, leukemias, lymphomas, Hodgkin disease, and other diseases associated with treatment with immunosuppressive drugs or radiation therapy; solid organ transplantation; multiple myeloma:

  • Any incomplete* series with:
    • 3 PCV13 doses: 1 dose PCV13 (at least 8 weeks after any prior PCV13 dose)
    • Less than 3 PCV13 doses: 2 doses PCV13 (8 weeks after the most recent dose and administered 8 weeks apart)
  • No history of PPSV23: 1 dose PPSV23 (at least 8 weeks after any prior PCV13 dose) and a 2nd dose of PPSV23 5 years later
  • No history of either PCV13 or PPSV23: 1 dose PCV13, 2 doses PPSV23 (dose 1 of PPSV23 administered 8 weeks after PCV13 and dose 2 of PPSV23 administered at least 5 years after dose 1 of PPSV23)
  • Any PCV13 but no PPSV23: 2 doses PPSV23 (dose 1 of PPSV23 administered 8 weeks after the most recent dose of PCV13 and dose 2 of PPSV23 administered at least 5 years after dose 1 of PPSV23)
  • PPSV23 but no PCV13: 1 dose PCV13 at least 8 weeks after the most recent PPSV23 dose and a 2nd dose of PPSV23 administered 5 years after dose 1 of PPSV23 and at least 8 weeks after a dose of PCV13

Chronic liver disease, alcoholism:

  • No history of PPSV23: 1 dose PPSV23 (at least 8 weeks after any prior PCV13 dose)

*An incomplete series is defined as not having received all doses in either the recommended series or an age-appropriate catch-up series. See Tables 8, 9, and 11 in the ACIP pneumococcal vaccine recommendations Cdc-pdf [24 pages] for complete schedule details.

Rotavirus vaccination (minimum age: 6 weeks)

Routine vaccination

  • Rotarix: 2-dose series at 2 and 4 months
  • RotaTeq: 3-dose series at 2, 4, and 6 months

If any dose in the series is either RotaTeq or unknown, default to 3-dose series.

Catch-up vaccination

  • Do not start the series on or after age 15 weeks, 0 days.
  • The maximum age for the final dose is 8 months, 0 days.
  • For other catch-up guidance, see Table 2.

Tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (Tdap) vaccination (minimum age: 11 years for routine vaccination, 7 years for catch-up vaccination)

Routine vaccination

  • Adolescents age 11–12 years: 1 dose Tdap
  • Pregnancy: 1 dose Tdap during each pregnancy, preferably in early part of gestational weeks 27–36
  • Tdap may be administered regardless of the interval since the last tetanus- and diphtheria-toxoid-containing vaccine.

Catch-up vaccination

  • Adolescents age 13–18 years who have not received Tdap: 1 dose Tdap, then Td booster every 10 years
  • Persons age 7–18 years not fully immunized with DTaP: 1 dose Tdap as part of the catch-up series (preferably the first dose); if additional doses are needed, use Td.
  • Children age 7–10 years who receive Tdap inadvertently or as part of the catch-up series should receive the routine Tdap dose at 11–12 years.
  • DTaP inadvertently given after the 7th birthday:
    • Child age 7–10 years: DTaP may count as part of catch-up series. Routine Tdap dose at 11–12 should be administered.
    • Adolescent age 11–18 years: Count dose of DTaP as the adolescent Tdap booster.
  • For other catch-up guidance, see Table 2.
  • See information on use of Tdap or Td as tetanus prophylaxis in wound management.

Varicella vaccination (minimum age: 12 months)

Routine vaccination

  • 2-dose series: 12–15 months, 4–6 years
  • Dose 2 may be administered as early as 3 months after dose 1 (a dose administered after a 4-week interval may be counted).

Catch-up vaccination

  • Ensure persons age 7–18 years without evidence of immunity (see MMWR Cdc-pdf [48 pages]) have 2-dose series:
    • Ages 7–12 years: routine interval: 3 months (minimum interval: 4 weeks)
    • Ages 13 years and older: routine interval: 4–8 weeks (minimum interval: 4 weeks)
    • The maximum age for use of MMRV is 12 years.

Vaccines in the Child and Adolescent Immunization Schedule*

child acronyms
Vaccines Abbreviations Trade Names
Diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis vaccine DTaP Daptacel
Infanrix
Diphtheria, tetanus vaccine DT No Trade Name
Haemophilus influenzae type B vaccine Hib (PRP-T)
Hib (PRP-OMP)
ActHIB Hiberix
PedvaxHIB
Hepatitis A vaccine HepA Havrix
Vaqta
Hepatitis B vaccine HepB Engerix-B
Recombivax HB
Human papillomavirus vaccine HPV Gardasil 9
Influenza vaccine (inactivated) IIV Multiple
Influenza vaccine (live, attenuated) LAIV FluMist
Measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine MMR M-M-R II
Meningococcal serogroups A, C, W, Y vaccine MenACWY-D
MenACWY-CRM
Menactra
Menveo
Meningococcal serogroup B vaccine MenB-4C
MenB-FHbp
Bexsero
Trumenba
Pneumococcal 13-valent conjugate vaccine PCV13 Prevnar 13
Pneumococcal 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine PPSV23 Pneumovax
Poliovirus vaccine (inactivated) IPV IPOL
Rotavirus vaccine RV1
RV5
Rotarix
RotaTeq
Tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis vaccine Tdap Adacel
Boostrix
Tetanus and diphtheria vaccine Td Tenivac
Td vaccine
Varicella vaccine VAR Varivax

Combination Vaccines

(Use combination vaccines instead of separate injections when appropriate)

Vaccines Abbreviations Trade Names
DTaP, hepatitis B, and inactivated poliovirus vaccine DTaP-HepB-IPV Pediarix
DTaP, inactivated poliovirus, and Haemophilus influenzae type B vaccine DTaP-IPV/Hib Pentacel
DTaP and inactivated poliovirus vaccine DTaP-IPV Kinrix
Quadracel
Measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella vaccines MMRV ProQuad
*Administer recommended vaccines if immunization history is incomplete or unknown. Do not restart or add doses to vaccine series for extended intervals between doses. When a vaccine is not administered at the recommended age, administer at a subsequent visit. The use of trade names is for identification purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the ACIP or CDC.

This schedule is Recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), and approved by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), American Academy of Pediatrics (AAPExternal ), American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFPExternal ), and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOGExternal ).

The comprehensive summary of the ACIP recommended changes made to the child and adolescent immunization schedule can be found in the February 8, 2019 MMWR.