2019 in spaceflight

By Wikipedia Contributors

NASA Commercial Crew group photo at JSC.jpg
2019 in spaceflight

This article documents expected notable spaceflight events during the year 2019.

Overview

Lunar exploration

China intends to launch Chang'e 5, the first sample-return mission to the Moon since Luna 24 in 1976, and to test a new generation of crewed spacecraft. Both of these missions will use the recently developed Long March 5 heavy-lift rocket. India plans to launch the delayed Chandrayaan-2 lunar orbiter/lander/rover in January. Some of the participants in the expired Google Lunar X Prize plan to launch their private missions to the Moon in 2019, first being SpaceIL with their Beresheet lander.[1]

Human spaceflight

The United States are expected to regain crewed launch capabilities lost after the Space Shuttle retirement in 2011. Crew capsules Dragon 2 by SpaceX and CST-100 Starliner by Boeing are scheduled to fly their demonstration missions to the International Space Station as part of NASA's Commercial Crew Development program.[2]

Blue Origin plans to send its own employees on board of New Shepard for the first crewed suborbital flight in the first half of 2019.[3]

Rocket innovation

Several manufacturers have announced the first orbital launches of new rockets for 2019: Firefly Alpha, LauncherOne and Vector-R in the USA, Hyperbola-1, Kuaizhou-11 and OneSpace-M1 in China, Bloostar and Vega-C in Europe, and SSLV in India.

Orbital launches

Date and time (UTC) Rocket Flight number Launch site LSP
Payload
(⚀ = CubeSat)
Operator Orbit Function Decay (UTC) Outcome
Remarks
Upcoming launches
6 January[4] United States Delta IV Heavy D-382 United States Vandenberg SLC-6 United States ULA
United States NROL-71 / Kennen (USA-290) NRO Low Earth Reconnaissance  
7 January
15:53[5][6]
United States Falcon 9 Block 5 F9-067 United States Vandenberg SLC-4E United States SpaceX
United States Iridium NEXT 66-75 Iridium Low Earth Communications  
17 January
00:50:20–00:59:37[7]
Japan Epsilon Japan Uchinoura Japan JAXA
Japan RAPIS-1 JAXA Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration  
Japan ALE-1 Astro Live Experiences Low Earth Artificial meteor shower  
Japan Hodoyoshi-2 (RISESat) Tohoku University Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Vietnam MicroDragon[8] VNSC TBD Technology demonstration  
Singapore / Japan AOBA-VELOX 4 Nanyang Technological University, Kyutech Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration  
Japan NEXUS Nihon University Low Earth Amateur radio  
Japan OrigamiSat-1 Tokyo Institute of Technology Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration  
18 January
~01:00[5]
United States Falcon 9 Block 5 United States Kennedy LC-39A United States SpaceX
United States SpX-DM1 SpaceX / NASA Low Earth (ISS) Flight test  
Crew Dragon Demo 1: Planned test of Dragon 2 as part of Commercial Crew Development program.
25 January
23:40–00:35[5]
United States Delta IV M+(5,4) D-383 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-37B United States ULA
United States WGS-10 U.S. Air Force Geosynchronous Communications  
Last flight of Delta IV M+ (5,4) variant[9]
31 January[10] India GSLV Mk III M1 India Satish Dhawan SLP India ISRO
India Chandrayaan-2 ISRO Selenocentric Lunar orbiter, lander and rover  
January (TBD)[11] China Long March 3C China Xichang LA-3 China CASC
China BeiDou G8 CNSA Geosynchronous Navigation  
January (TBD)[11] China Long March 11 Y6 China ? China CASC
TBA Low Earth  
January (TBD)[5] India PSLV C44[12] India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India EMISAT ISRO ? ELINT[13]  
January (TBD)[14] India PSLV-XL C45[12] India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India RISAT-2B ISRO Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation (radar)  
January (TBD)[2] United States Vector-R EFT-1 United States MARS LP-0B / Kodiak[15] United States Vector Space Systems
Delfi-PQ TU Delft Low Earth Technology demo  
Unicorn-2a Alba Orbital[16] Low Earth Amateur radio  
First orbital flight of the Vector-R rocket.
5 February[17] Europe Ariane 5 ECA VA247 France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
India GSAT-31[18] ISRO Geosynchronous Communications  
Cyprus Hellas Sat 4 / Saudi Arabia SaudiGeoSat-1 Hellas-Sat / ArabSat Geosynchronous Communications  
7 February[19] Russia Soyuz-2.1b Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 31/6 Russia Roscosmos
Egypt EgyptSat A NARSS Low Earth Earth observation  
Canada Helios Wire 4[20] Helios Wire Low Earth Communications (M2M)  
13 February[5] United States Falcon 9 Block 5 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 or LC-39A United States SpaceX
Indonesia PSN-6 PSN Geosynchronous Communications  
Israel Beresheet[1] (formerly Sparrow)[23] SpaceIL Moon transfer Moon lander  
TBA Spaceflight Industries[22] Geosynchronous ?  
Sparrow will raise its orbit towards the Moon from a supersynchronous transfer orbit with 60,000 km apogee.[21] Several piggyback payloads will be deployed from the main PSN-6 satellite.[22]
18 February[24] United States Falcon 9 Block 5 United States Vandenberg SLC-4E United States SpaceX
Canada RADARSAT Constellation × 3[25] Canadian Space Agency Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
28 February[5] Russia Soyuz-FG Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 1/5 Russia Roscosmos
Russia Soyuz MS-12 / 58S Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) Expedition 59/60  
Crewed flight with three cosmonauts
Late February (TBD)[26] United States Falcon Heavy United States Kennedy LC-39A United States SpaceX
Saudi Arabia Arabsat-6A[27] ArabSat Geosynchronous Communications  
February (TBD)[11] China Long March 3A (?) 3A-Yxx[28] China ? China CASC
China BeiDou-3 I1Q CNSA IGSO Navigation  
February (TBD)[29] India PSLV-CA C46[12] India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India Cartosat-3 ISRO Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Canada India NEMO-AM University of Toronto / ISRO Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Late February (TBD)[30] Russia Soyuz ST-B / Fregat-MT France Kourou ELS France Arianespace
Jersey OneWeb × 4 or 6
(pilot flight)
OneWeb Low Earth Communications  
28 March[5] Russia Soyuz-2.1a Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 31/6 Russia Roscosmos
Russia Progress MS-11 / 72P Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
March (TBD)[17] Europe Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
South Korea GEO-KOMPSAT-2B[31][32][a] KARI Geosynchronous Ocean monitoring  
March (TBD)[33] United States Atlas V N22[34] AV-080 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-41 United States ULA
United States Starliner Boe-OFT Boeing / NASA Low Earth (ISS) Flight test  
Boeing Orbital Flight Test of CST-100 Starliner as part of Commercial Crew Development program. 30-day robotic mission.
March (TBD)[5] United States Falcon 9 Block 5 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 or LC-39A United States SpaceX
United States SpaceX CRS-17 NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
March (TBD)[35] United States Falcon Heavy United States Kennedy LC-39A United States SpaceX
United States STP-2 U.S. Air Force Low Earth, Medium Earth[36] Technology demo  
March (TBD)[35] United States Minotaur I United States MARS LP-0B United States Northrop Grumman
United States NROL-111 NRO ? Reconnaissance  
March (TBD)[10] India PSLV-XL C47[12] India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India RISAT-2BR1 ISRO Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation (radar)  
March (TBD)[19] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Vostochny Site 1S[37] Russia Roscosmos
Russia Meteor-M2-2 Roscosmos Low Earth (SSO) Meteorology  
Russia Germany Avrora-Amikal[38] SINP, UGA Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Russia Germany GOS SINP, German Orbital Systems Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
United States Momentus X1 Astro Digital Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration  
United States Landmapper-BC 5,6 Astro Digital Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
March (TBD)[17] Europe Vega VV14 France Kourou ELV France Arianespace
Italy PRISMA Italian Space Agency Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Q1 (TBD)[39] Europe Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
Europe EDRS-C[40] / United Kingdom HYLAS-3[a] ESA / Avanti Geosynchronous Communications  
Q1 (TBD)[17] Europe Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
France Eutelsat 7C[41][42][a] Eutelsat Geosynchronous Communications  
Q1 (TBD)[10] India GSLV Mk II India Satish Dhawan SLP India ISRO
India GISAT 1[43] ISRO Geosynchronous Earth observation  
Q1 (TBD)[10] India GSLV ? India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India GSAT-24 ISRO Geosynchronous Communications  
Q1 (TBD)[2] United States LauncherOne F1 United States Cosmic Girl, Mojave United States Virgin Orbit
United States TBA Virgin Orbit TBA Flight test  
Maiden orbital flight.
Q1 (TBD)[11] China Long March 3B/E 3B-Yxx[28] China Xichang China CASC
China APStar 6D APT Satellite Holdings Geosynchronous Communications  
Q1 (TBD) China Long March 3B/E China Xichang LC-2 China CASC
China ChinaSat 18 China Satcom Geosynchronous Communications  
Q1 (TBD)[5] United States Pegasus-XL F44 United States Stargazer, CCAFS Skid Strip United States NG Innovation
United States ICON NASA Low Earth Ionosphere research  
Q1 (TBD)[10] India PSLV-XL India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India IRNSS Ext2 ISRO Geosynchronous Navigation  
Q1 (TBD)[10] India PSLV India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
United States Capella 2 Capella Space Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation (radar)  
Q1 (TBD)[19] Russia Rokot / Briz-KM Russia Plesetsk Site 133/3 Russia RVSN RF
Russia Gonets-M 14[44][45] Gonets Satellite System Low Earth Communications  
Russia Gonets-M 15 Gonets Satellite System Low Earth Communications  
Russia Gonets-M 16 Gonets Satellite System Low Earth Communications  
Russia BLITS-M Roscosmos Low Earth Laser ranging  
Q1 (TBD)[46] Russia Soyuz-2.1a / Fregat-M Russia Plesetsk Site 43/4 Russia RVSN RF
Russia Meridian 8 (18L) VKS Molniya Communications (military)  
Q1 (TBD)[47] Iran Simorgh[48] Iran Semnan Iran ISA
Iran Payam-e Amirkabir Amirkabir University of Technology Low Earth Satellite imagery  
Iran Nahid-1 Iranian Space Research Center Low Earth Earth observation, Communications  
Q1 (TBD)[19] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Plesetsk Site 43/4 Russia RVSN RF
Russia GLONASS-M 758 VKS Medium Earth Navigation  
Q1 (TBD)[17] Europe Vega VV15 France Kourou ELV France Arianespace
United States Athena PointView Tech Low Earth (SSO) Communications  
Italy ION CubeSat Carrier D-Orbit Low Earth (SSO) CubeSat deployer  
European Union Small Satellites Mission Service ESA Low Earth (SSO) Technology demo  
17 April[5] United States Antares 230 United States MARS LP-0A United States Northrop Grumman
United States Cygnus NG-11 NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
April (TBD)[11] China Long March 2D 2D-Yxx[49] China Jiuquan SLS-2 China CASC
China Shijian 19 ? ? ?  
April (TBD)[11] China Long March 3A 3A-Yxx[28] China ? China CASC
China BeiDou-3 I2Q CNSA IGSO Navigation  
April (TBD)[11] China Long March 3B/E 3B-Yxx[28] China Xichang China CASC
Nicaragua NicaSat-1 (LSTSAT-1) Nicaraguan government Geosynchronous Communications  
April (TBD)[19] Russia Proton-M / DM-03 Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Roscosmos
Russia Germany Spektr-RG[50] IKI RAN
Max Planck Institute
Geosynchronous X-ray astronomy  
April (TBD)[17] Russia Soyuz ST-B / Fregat-MT France Kourou ELS France Arianespace
Luxembourg O3b × 4 (FM17–FM20) SES S.A. Medium Earth Communications  
7 May[5] United States Falcon 9 Block 5 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 or LC-39A United States SpaceX
United States SpaceX CRS-18 NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
May (TBD)[18] Europe Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
India GSAT-30[a] ISRO Geosynchronous Communications  
May (TBD)[51] Russia Proton-M / Briz-M P4 Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia United States ILS
France Eutelsat 5 West B Eutelsat Geosynchronous Communications  
United States MEV-1 Northrop Grumman Geosynchronous Satellite servicing  
May (TBD)[10] India SSLV D1 India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
? ISRO Low Earth (SSO) Test flight  
Maiden flight of India's Small Satellite Launch Vehicle (SSLV)
5 June[52] Russia Soyuz-2.1a Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Roscosmos
Russia Progress MS-12 / 73P Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
June (TBD)[33] United States Falcon 9 Block 5 United States Kennedy LC-39A United States SpaceX
United States SpX-DM2 SpaceX / NASA Low Earth (ISS) Flight test  
Crew Dragon Demo 2: Crewed flight test of Dragon 2 as part of the Commercial Crew Development program
June (TBD)[11] China Hyperbola-1 China ? China i-Space
TBA Low Earth  
June (TBD)[11] China Long March 11 China Ship in the Indian Ocean China CASC
TBA Low Earth  
Sea launch near the Equator
Q2 (TBD)[53] United States Falcon 9 Block 5 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 or LC-39A United States SpaceX
Israel Amos 17[54] Spacecom Geosynchronous Communications  
Q2 (TBD)[55] China Kuaizhou 1A F3 China Jiuquan SLS-E1 China CASIC
TBA Low Earth (SSO)  
Q2 (TBD)[56] China Long March 2C 2C-Yxx[49] China Taiyuan LC-9 China CAST
China HaiYang 1D CAST Low Earth Earth observation  
Q2 (TBD)[5] China Long March 5 Y3[57] China Wenchang LC-1 China CASC
China Shijian 20 (18-02) CAST Geosynchronous Communications  
Q2 (TBD)[51] Russia Proton-M / Briz-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia RVSN RF
Russia Blagovest-14L VKS Geosynchronous Communications (military)  
Q2 (TBD)[51] Russia Proton-M / Briz-M P4 Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Roscosmos
Russia Yamal-601 Gazprom Space Systems Geosynchronous Communications  
Mid 2019 (TBD)[11] China Long March 3B/E 3B-Yxx[28] China Xichang China CASC
China TCSTAR-1 Thaicom (company) Geosynchronous Communications  
Mid 2019 (TBD)[11] China Long March 11 China Ship in the Indian Ocean China CASC
China Zhuhai-1 OHS 2E–2H[58] Zhuhai Orbita Control Engineering Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
China Zhuhai-1 OVS 2B[59] Zhuhai Orbita Control Engineering Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Mid 2019 (TBD)[60] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Plesetsk Site 43/4 Russia RVSN RF
Russia GLONASS-K №15 (K1 №3) VKS Medium Earth Navigation  
H1 (TBD)[61] China Kuaizhou 11 Y1 China Jiuquan China CASIC
China Jilin-1 02A CNSA Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
China Ouke-Micro 1 Low Earth (SSO)  
China Sunflower 1A/1B (Xiangrikui 1A/1B) CNSA Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
China Tianyi 4[62] Tianyi Research Institute Low Earth (SSO) Gamma-ray burst detection  
China Yinhe Low Earth (SSO)  
China Zhongwei 1 Low Earth (SSO)  
Maiden flight of Kuaizhou 11 version. Payloads most likely will change.
24 July[64] Russia Soyuz-FG Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 1/5 Russia Roscosmos
Russia Soyuz MS-13 / 59S Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) Expedition 60/61  
Crewed flight with three cosmonauts. Last Soyuz seat contracted by NASA.[63]
July (TBD)[35] United States Atlas V 541 AV-084 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-41 United States ULA
United States AEHF-5[65] U.S. Air Force Geosynchronous Communications (military)  
July (TBD)[35] United States Atlas V 551 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-41 United States ULA
United States STP-3 (STPSat-6)[66] USAF Advanced Systems and Development Directorate Geosynchronous Technology experiments  
July (TBD)[52] Japan H-IIB Japan Tanegashima LA-Y2 Japan MHI
Japan HTV-8 JAXA Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
July (TBD)[11] China Long March 3A (?) 3A-Yxx[28] China ? China CASC
China BeiDou-3 I3Q CNSA IGSO Navigation  
Summer (TBD)[67] United States Delta IV M+ (4,2)U D-384 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-37B United States ULA
United States GPS IIIA-02 U.S. Air Force Medium Earth Navigation  
Last flight of the Delta IV "single stick" M+ series. Only Delta IV Heavy will keep flying.
August (TBD)[33] United States Atlas V N22 AV-082 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-41 United States ULA
United States Starliner Boe-CFT Boeing / NASA Low Earth (ISS) Flight test / ISS crew transport  
Boeing Crewed Flight Test of CST-100 Starliner as part of Commercial Crew Development program (nominally 14 days). May also become the first operational mission with a longer duration, as part of ISS Crew Transportation Services program.
August (TBD)[10] India GSLV Mk III India Satish Dhawan SLP India ISRO
India GSAT-20 ISRO Geosynchronous Communications  
August (TBD)[30] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 31/6 France Arianespace / Russia Starsem
Jersey OneWeb × 34–36
(Baikonur flight 1)
OneWeb Low Earth Communications  
First launch of OneWeb satellites from Baikonur followed by 9 more from the same site every 20-25 days, then 6 from Vostochny.[30]
4 September[64] Russia Soyuz-2.1a Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 1/5 Russia Roscosmos
Russia Soyuz MS-14 Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) Test flight  
Uncrewed flight to certify Soyuz-2.1a for crewed flights.[64][68][69]
Q3 (TBD)[2] United States Falcon 9 Block 5 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 or LC-39A United States SpaceX
Germany ALINA[72] PTScientists Moon transfer Moon lander  
The Autonomous Landing and Navigation Module (ALINA) will land near the Apollo 17 landing site and deploy two Audi lunar rovers. They will try to locate NASA's Lunar Roving Vehicle and stream images back to Earth using a small 4G base station on ALINA developed by Nokia and Vodafone Germany.[70][71]
Q3 (TBD)[10] India GSLV ? India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India GSAT-7C ISRO Geosynchronous Communications  
Q3 (TBD)[10] India GSLV ? India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India GSAT-25 ISRO Geosynchronous Communications  
Q3 (TBD)[51] Russia Proton-M / Briz-M P4 Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Roscosmos
Russia Ekspress 80 RSCC Geosynchronous Communications  
Russia Ekspress 103 RSCC Geosynchronous Communications  
Q3 (TBD)[10] India PSLV India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India Cartosat-3A ISRO Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
United States Landmapper-BC 7 Astro Digital Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Q3 (TBD)[10] India PSLV-XL India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India IRNSS Ext3 ISRO Geosynchronous Navigation  
Q3 (TBD)[10] India PSLV India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India ResourceSat 3S ISRO Low Earth (SSO ?) Earth observation  
Q3 (TBD)[10] India PSLV India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India SPADEX × 2 ISRO Low Earth Docking experiment[73]  
1 October[52] United States Antares 230 United States MARS LP-0A United States Northrop Grumman
United States Cygnus NG-12 NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
2 October[52] United States Falcon 9 Block 5 United States Kennedy LC-39A United States SpaceX
United States Crew Dragon USCV 1 SpaceX / NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS crew transport  
First operational mission of Dragon 2 as part of the ISS Crew Transportation Services program.
8 October[64] Russia Soyuz-FG[19] Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 1/5 Russia Roscosmos
Russia Soyuz MS-15 Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) Expedition 61/62  
Last flight of Soyuz-FG, to be replaced by Soyuz-2.1a for crewed missions starting with Soyuz MS-16 in April 2020.
15 October[52] United States Falcon 9 Block 5 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 or LC-39A United States SpaceX
United States SpaceX CRS-19 NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
United States NanoRacks Airlock Module NanoRacks Low Earth (ISS) ISS Assembly  
15 October[17] Russia Soyuz ST-B / Fregat-MT France Kourou ELS France Arianespace
Europe CHEOPS ESA Low Earth (SSO) Space telescope  
Italy COSMO-SkyMed (CSG 1) ASI Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation (radar)  
October (TBD)[11] China Long March 3B / YZ-1 3B-Yxx[28] China ? China CASC
China BeiDou-3 M19 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation  
China BeiDou-3 M20 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation  
October (TBD)[10] India SSLV (D2) India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
? ISRO Low Earth (SSO) Test flight  
Maiden flight of India's Small Satellite Launch Vehicle (SSLV)
8 November[64][51][52] Russia Proton-M P4 Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Roscosmos
Russia Nauka Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) ISS assembly  
21 November[10] India PSLV India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
United Kingdom Lunar Pathfinder Goonhilly Earth Station
Surrey Satellite Technology
Selenocentric Satellite dispenser  
November (TBD)[19] Russia Soyuz-2.1b Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 31/6 Russia Roscosmos
Russia Resurs-P No.4 Roscosmos Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
November (TBD)[17][74] Russia Soyuz ST-B / Fregat-MT France Kourou ELS France Arianespace
Jersey OneWeb × 34[17][75]
(Kourou flight 2)
OneWeb Low Earth Communications  
December (TBD)[76] Russia Angara A5 / Blok DM-03 Russia Plesetsk Site 35 Russia RVSN RF
dummy payload matching a satellite in size and weight Roscosmos Flight test  
Test of Blok DM-03 modification for Angara
December (TBD)[67] United States Falcon 9 Block 5 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 or LC-39A United States SpaceX
United States GPS IIIA-03 U.S. Air Force Medium Earth Navigation  
December (TBD)[2] United States Firefly Alpha United States Vandenberg SLC-2W[77] United States Firefly
? Firefly Aerospace Low Earth Test flight  
Maiden launch of the Firefly Alpha commercial smallsat launcher
December (TBD)[11] China Long March 3B / YZ-1 3B-Yxx[28] China ? China CASC
China BeiDou-3 M21 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation  
China BeiDou-3 M22 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation  
Early December (TBD)[64] Russia Soyuz-2.1a Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Roscosmos
Russia Progress MS-13 / 74P Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics  
Launch date depends on Nauka module launch, as Progress MS-13 carries equipment for the module[64]
Q4 (TBD)[78] United States Electron New Zealand Mahia LC-1 United States Rocket Lab
United States MX-1E F1 + Celestis Luna 02 Moon Express, Celestis LEO, then TLI[79] Lunar lander  
Q4 (TBD)[5] United States Falcon 9 Block 5 United States Vandenberg SLC-4E United States SpaceX
Argentina SAOCOM 1B[80] CONAE Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Q4 (TBD)[2] United States Falcon 9 Block 5 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 or LC-39A United States SpaceX
United States SXM 7 Sirius XM Geosynchronous Communications  
Q4 (TBD)[11] China ? China ? China CASC
TianQin × 3 Sun Yat-sen University Low Earth Gravitational wave detection  
Q4 (TBD)[51] Russia Proton-M / Briz-M P4 Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia United States ILS
Canada Anik G2V Telesat Geosynchronous Communications  
Q4 (TBD)[19] Russia Soyuz-2.1a / Fregat-M Russia Vostochny Site 1S[37] Russia Roscosmos
Russia Kondor-FKA No.1 Roscosmos Low Earth Reconnaissance  
Q4 (TBD)[60] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Plesetsk Site 43/4 Russia RVSN RF
Russia GLONASS-K2 13L (K2 №1) VKS Medium Earth Navigation  
Q4 (TBD)[74] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 31/6 France Arianespace / Russia Starsem
Jersey OneWeb × 34–36
(Baikonur flight 2)
OneWeb Low Earth Communications  
Q4 (TBD)[74] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 31/6 France Arianespace / Russia Starsem
Jersey OneWeb × 34–36
(Baikonur flight 3)
OneWeb Low Earth Communications  
Q4 (TBD)[74] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 31/6 France Arianespace / Russia Starsem
Jersey OneWeb × 34–36
(Baikonur flight 4)
OneWeb Low Earth Communications  
Q4 (TBD)[17] Europe Vega France Kourou ELV France Arianespace
Spain Ingenio[81] Hisdesat Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Q4 (TBD)[17] Europe Vega-C VC01 France Kourou ELV France Arianespace
LARES 2[83] ASI Low Earth Gravitation research, geodesy  
Maiden flight of Vega-C[82]
Q4 (TBD)[84] Ukraine Zenit-3SL Russia Odyssey Russia / United States S7 Sea Launch
dummy or real satellite[84]  
2019 (TBD)[41] Europe Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
France Eutelsat-Konnect (African Broadband Satellite)[85][a] Eutelsat Geosynchronous Communications  
2019 (TBD)[41] Europe Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
France Eutelsat Quantum[41][a] Eutelsat Geosynchronous Communications  
H2, 2019 (TBD)[86] Europe Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
United Kingdom Inmarsat-5 F5[a] Inmarsat Geosynchronous Communications  
H2, 2019 (TBD) European Union Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
United States Intelsat 39[a] Intelsat Geosynchronous Communications  
2019 (TBD)[87] Europe Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
Japan JCSAT-17[a] JSAT Geosynchronous Communications  
2019 (TBD)[88] Europe Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
Europe MTG-I1[89][a] EUMETSAT Geosynchronous Meteorology  
2019 (TBD)[90] Europe Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
Brazil Star One D2[a] Star One Geosynchronous Communications  
2019 (TBD)[91] United States Atlas V 501 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-41 United States ULA
United States AFSPC-7 (X-37B OTV-6) US Air Force Low Earth Technology  
2019 (TBD)[35] United States Atlas V 551[92] AV-088 United States CCAFS SLC-41 United States ULA
United States NROL-101[92] NRO Reconnaissance  
2019 (TBD)[2] United States Atlas V N22 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-41 United States ULA
United States Starliner CTS-1 / USCV 2 Boeing / NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS crew transport  
Second operational mission of Starliner, as part of the ISS Crew Transportation Services program.
2019 (TBD)[93] United States Delta IV Heavy D-385 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-37B United States ULA
United States Orion 10 / NROL-44 NRO Geosynchronous Reconnaissance  
2019 (TBD)[94] United States Electron New Zealand Mahia LC-1 United States Rocket Lab
United States BlackSky Global 4 BlackSky Global Low Earth Earth observation  
2019 (TBD)[94] United States Electron New Zealand Mahia LC-1 United States Rocket Lab
United States Flock series Planet Labs Low Earth Earth observation  
2019 (TBD)[94] United States Electron New Zealand Mahia LC-1 United States Rocket Lab
United States Outernet 2 Outernet Low Earth Communications  
2019 (TBD)[94] United States Electron New Zealand Mahia LC-1 United States Rocket Lab
United States SpaceBEE 5–8 Swarm Low Earth (SSO) Communications  
2019 (TBD)[78] United States Electron New Zealand Mahia LC-1 United States Rocket Lab
United States MX-1E F2 Moon Express LEO, then TLI[79] Lunar lander  
2019 (TBD)[95] Japan Epsilon Japan Uchinoura Japan JAXA
Vietnam JV-LOTUSat 1 Vietnam Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
2019 (TBD)[96] United States Falcon 9 Block 5 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 or LC-39A United States SpaceX
Japan JCSat 18[97] /
Singapore Kacific 1
JSAT
Kacific
Geosynchronous Communications  
2019 (TBD)[2] United States Falcon 9 Block 5 United States Vandenberg SLC-4E United States SpaceX
Germany SARah 1[98] Bundeswehr Low Earth (SSO) Reconnaissance  
2019 (TBD)[2] United States Falcon 9 Block 5 United States Vandenberg SLC-4E United States SpaceX
Germany SARah 2[98] Bundeswehr Low Earth (SSO) Reconnaissance  
Germany SARah 3[98] Bundeswehr Low Earth (SSO) Reconnaissance  
2019 (TBD)[10] India GSLV Mk III India Satish Dhawan SLP India ISRO
India Gaganyaan 1 ISRO Low Earth Flight test  
First flight of the Gaganyaan capsule (uncrewed)
2019 (TBD)[10] India GSLV Mk III D3 India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India GSAT-22 ISRO Geosynchronous Communications  
2019 (TBD)[95] Japan H-IIA Japan Tanegashima LA-Y1 Japan MHI
Japan IGS-Optical 7 CSICE Low Earth (SSO) Reconnaissance  
2019 (TBD)[95] Japan H-IIA Japan Tanegashima LA-Y1 Japan MHI
Japan SELENE-2 JAXA Selenocentric Lunar lander  
Includes an orbiter, a lander and a rover.
H2, 2019 (TBD)[11] China Kuaizhou 1A China ? China CASIC
Hainan-1 × 3 ? Low Earth ?  
2019 (TBD)[99] United States LauncherOne F2 United States Cosmic Girl, Mojave United States Virgin Orbit
United States CACTUS-1 Capitol Technology University Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States CAPE-3 University of Louisiana Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States ExoCube-2 NASA Low Earth Atmospheric research  
United States IMPACT 2A, 2B NASA Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States INCA NMSU Low Earth Ionospheric research  
United States MicroMAS-2b MIT Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States MiTEE-1 University of Michigan Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States PICS 1, 2 Brigham Young University Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States PolarCube Colorado Space Grant Consortium Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States Q-PACE (Cu-PACE) UCF Low Earth Microgravity research  
United States RadFxSat-2 (Fox-1E) AMSAT Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States SHFT-2 NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory Low Earth Technology demonstration  
United States TechEdSat-7 (TES-7) SJSU, NASA, University of Idaho Low Earth Technology demonstration  
Launch for NASA's Educational Launch of Nanosatellites (ELaNa) program
2019 (TBD)[99] United States LauncherOne United States Cosmic Girl, Mojave United States Virgin Orbit
United Kingdom TBA Sky and Space Global Low Earth Communications  
2019 (TBD)[100] United States LauncherOne United States Cosmic Girl, Mojave United States Virgin Orbit
United States SpaceBelt 1[100] Cloud Constellation Low Earth Communications  
2019 (TBD)[101] United States LauncherOne United States Cosmic Girl, Mojave United States Virgin Orbit
Denmark Starling 1–8[102] Aerial & Maritime / GomSpace Low Earth AIS ship tracking  
2019 (TBD)[103] United States LauncherOne United States Cosmic Girl, Kennedy United States Virgin Orbit
United States STP (TBD)[104] U.S. Air Force Low Earth Technology demonstration  
2019 (TBD)[56] China Long March 2D 2D-Yxx[49] China ? China CASC
China Gaofen 7 CAST Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
2019 (TBD)[11] China Long March 3B / YZ-1 China Xichang China CASC
China BeiDou-3 M23 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation  
China BeiDou-3 M24 CNSA Medium Earth Navigation  
2019 (TBD)[11] China Long March 3B/E China Xichang LC-2 China CASC
China ChinaSat 6C (Zhongxing 6C)[11] China Satcom Geosynchronous Communications  
2019 (TBD)[11] China Long March 3B China Xichang or Wenchang China CAST
China Fengyun 4B CMA Geosynchronous Meteorology  
2019 (TBD)[11] China Long March 3B/E China Xichang China CASC
Nicaragua NicaSat-2 Nicaraguan government Geosynchronous Communications  
2019 (TBD)[56] China Long March 3B 3B-Yxx[28] China Xichang China CASC
Sri Lanka SupremeSat II SupremeSAT Geosynchronous Communications  
2019 (TBD)[11] China Long March 3C China Xichang LA-3 China CASC
China Tianlian 2 CNSA Geosynchronous Communications (tracking and relay)  
2019 (TBD)[11] China Long March 4B China Taiyuan LC-9 China CAST
China HaiYang 2C CAST Low Earth Earth observation  
2019 (TBD)[11] China Long March 4B China Taiyuan LA-9 China CAST
China HaiYang 2D CAST Low Earth Earth observation  
2019 (TBD)[11] China Long March 4B 4B-Yxx[105] China Taiyuan LA-9 China CASC
China Ziyuan 2D PLA Polar Earth observation  
China BNU-1[106] Beijing Normal University Polar Earth observation  
China Tianyi MV-1 Beijing Normal University Polar Earth observation  
2019 (TBD)[11] China Long March 4B China Taiyuan LA-9 China CAST
China Ziyuan-3 03 CAST Low Earth Earth observation  
2019 (TBD)[11] China ? China China CAST
China HaiYang 3A CAST Low Earth Earth observation  
2019 (TBD)[11] China Long March 4C China ? China CAST
China TBA ? ? Test flight  
Test of grid fins towards development of reusable boosters for Long March 8
2019 (TBD)[11] China Long March 4C China ? China CAST
China Fengyun 3E CMA Geosynchronous Meteorology  
2019 (TBD)[11] China Long March 4C (?) China Taiyuan LA-9 China CAST
China Fengyun 3RM-1 CMA Geosynchronous Meteorology  
H2, 2019 (TBD)[11] China Long March 4B 4B-Yxx[105] China Taiyuan LA-9[105] China CASC
China Brazil CBERS 4A / Ziyuan 1E2 CASC / INPE Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
H2, 2019 (TBD)[11] China Long March 5B TBA[57] China Wenchang LC-1 China CASC
China New Generation Manned Spacecraft CNSA Low Earth Test flight  
2019 (TBD)[11] China Long March 5 TBA[57] China Wenchang LC-1 China CASC
China Chang'e 5 CNSA Selenocentric Lunar lander  
China's first lunar sample return mission.
2019 (TBD)[11] China ? China ? China CASC
China Brazil CBERS 5 CASC / INPE Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
2019 (TBD)[10] India PSLV-XL India Satish Dhawan FLP India ISRO
India IRNSS-1J (Ext1) ISRO Geosynchronous Navigation  
2019 (TBD)[10] India PSLV-XL India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India IRNSS-S1 ISRO Geosynchronous Navigation  
2019 (TBD)[10] India PSLV-CA India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India Oceansat-3 ISRO Low Earth (SSO) Oceanography  
2019 (TBD)[10] India PSLV-XL India Satish Dhawan India ISRO
India RISAT-1A ISRO Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation (radar)  
2019 (TBD)[19] Russia Rokot / Briz-KM Russia Plesetsk Site 133/3 Russia RVSN RF
Russia Geo-IK-2 No.3 (Musson-2) VKS Low Earth Geodesy  
Originally planned on a Soyuz-2-1v, switched to a Rokot in June 2017. Planned to be last flight of the Rokot carrier.[107]
2019 (TBD)[19] Russia Rokot / Briz-KM Russia Plesetsk Site 133/3 Russia RVSN RF
Russia Strela-3M 19[108] VKS Low Earth Communications  
Russia Strela-3M 20 VKS Low Earth Communications  
Russia Strela-3M 21 VKS Low Earth Communications  
2019 (TBD)[19] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Roscosmos
Russia Arktika-M №1[109] Roscosmos Molniya Earth observation  
2019 (TBD)[19] Russia Soyuz-2.1a Russia Plesetsk Site 43/4 Russia RVSN RF
Russia Bars-M 3L VKS Low Earth (SSO) Reconnaissance  
2019 (TBD)[37][110] Russia Soyuz-2.1b / Fregat-M Russia Plesetsk Russia Roscosmos
Russia Gonets-M 17[44] Gonets Satellite System Low Earth Communications  
Russia Gonets-M 18 Gonets Satellite System Low Earth Communications  
Russia Gonets-M 19 Gonets Satellite System Low Earth Communications  
2019 (TBD)[19] Russia Soyuz-2.1a / Fregat[111] Russia Plesetsk Site 43/4 Russia RVSN RF
Russia Neitron VKS ? ?  
2019 (TBD)[19] Russia Soyuz-2.1a / Fregat-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Roscosmos
Russia Smotr-R No.1 Gazprom Space Systems TBD Earth observation  
Russia Smotr-R No.2 Gazprom Space Systems TBD Earth observation  
2019 (TBD)[19] Russia Soyuz-2.1a / Fregat-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Russia Roscosmos
Russia Smotr-IK No.1 Gazprom Space Systems TBD Earth observation  
Russia Smotr-IK No.2 Gazprom Space Systems TBD Earth observation  
Russia Smotr-IK No.3 Gazprom Space Systems TBD Earth observation  
Russia Smotr-IK No.4 Gazprom Space Systems TBD Earth observation  
2019 (TBD)[19] Russia Start-1 Russia Plesetsk Russia VKS
Israel EROS C[112] ImageSat Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
2019 (TBD)[2] United States Vector-R United States MARS LP-0B (?) United States Vector Space Systems
United States Landmapper-HD Astro Digital[113] Low Earth Earth observation  
2019 (TBD)[2] United States Vector-R United States MARS LP-0B (?) United States Vector Space Systems
United Kingdom Open Cosmos 1 ? Low Earth ?  
2019 (TBD)[114] Europe Vega France Kourou ELV France Arianespace
United Arab Emirates Falcon Eye 1[114] UAE Armed Forces Low Earth IMINT (Reconnaissance)  
2019 (TBD)[114] Europe Vega France Kourou ELV France Arianespace
United Arab Emirates Falcon Eye 2[114] UAE Armed Forces Low Earth IMINT (Reconnaissance)  
2019 (TBD)[17] Europe Vega or Soyuz ST[115] France Kourou ELV France Arianespace
France TARANIS CNES Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation  
Piggyback on another flight[115]
2019 (TBD)[11] China Zhuque-1 China Mobile launch truck China LandSpace
Several nanosatellites GomSpace ?  

Suborbital flights

Date and time (UTC) Rocket Flight number Launch site LSP
Payload
(⚀ = CubeSat)
Operator Orbit Function Decay (UTC) Outcome
Remarks
March (TBD)[117] United States Falcon 9 United States Kennedy LC-39A United States SpaceX
United States Dragon 2 SpaceX Suborbital Test flight  
In-flight abort test at Max Q, performed by the capsule from the first demonstration mission SpX-DM1.[116]
April (TBD)[119] United States Orion Abort Test Booster United States Cape Canaveral SLC-46 United States Orbital ATK
United States Orion Ascent Abort-2 NASA Suborbital Test flight  
In-flight abort test under the highest aerodynamic loads. A specific booster repurposed from a LGM-118 Peacekeeper missile is being developed for this mission.[118]
H1(TBD) [3] United States New Shepard United States Corn Ranch United States Blue Origin
United States Crew Capsule 2.0 Blue Origin Suborbital Test flight  
First crewed flight
2019 (TBD)[120] Spain Arion 1 Spain El Arenosillo Spain PLD Space
Suborbital Microgravity Research  
Maiden flight of Arion 1. Apogee: 150 kilometres (93 mi).

Deep-space rendezvous

Date (UTC) Spacecraft Event Remarks
1 January New Horizons Flyby of Kuiper belt object (486958) 2014 MU69
4 January[121] Chang'e 4 Landing at Von Kármán crater Planned first landing on the far side of the Moon
12 February Juno 18th perijove of Jupiter
4 April Parker Solar Probe Second perihelion
6 April Juno 19th perijove
29 May Juno 20th perijove
21 July Juno 21st perijove
1 September Parker Solar Probe Third perihelion
12 September Juno 22nd perijove
3 November Juno 23rd perijove
26 December Parker Solar Probe Second gravity assist at Venus
26 December Juno 24th perijove
December Hayabusa2 Departure from asteroid Ryugu

Extravehicular activities (EVAs)

Start Date/Time Duration End Time Spacecraft Crew Remarks

Orbital launch statistics

By country

For the purposes of this section, the yearly tally of orbital launches by country assigns each flight to the country of origin of the rocket, not to the launch services provider or the spaceport. For example, Soyuz launches by Arianespace in Kourou are counted under Russia because Soyuz-2 is a Russian rocket.

China: 0Europe: 0India: 0Iran: 0Israel: 0Japan: 0North Korea: 0Russia: 0Ukraine: 0USA: 0Circle frame.svg
Country Launches Successes Failures Partial
failures
Remarks
 China 0 0 0 0
 Europe 0 0 0 0
 India 0 0 0 0
 Japan 0 0 0 0
 Russia 0 0 0 0 Includes European Soyuz
 United States 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0

By rocket

By family

By type

By configuration

By spaceport

0
0
0
0
0
0
China
France
India
Japan
New Zealand
Russia +
Kazakhstan
United States
Site Country Launches Successes Failures Partial failures Remarks
Baikonur  Kazakhstan 0 0 0 0
Cape Canaveral  United States 0 0 0 0
Jiuquan  China 0 0 0 0
Kennedy  United States 0 0 0 0
Kourou  France 0 0 0 0
Mahia  New Zealand 0 0 0 0
MARS  United States 0 0 0 0
Plesetsk  Russia 0 0 0 0
Satish Dhawan  India 0 0 0 0
Taiyuan  China 0 0 0 0
Tanegashima  Japan 0 0 0 0
Uchinoura  Japan 0 0 0 0
Vandenberg  United States 0 0 0 0
Vostochny  Russia 0 0 0 0
Wenchang  China 0 0 0 0
Xichang  China 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0

By orbit

  •   Transatmospheric
  •   Low Earth
  •   Low Earth (ISS)
  •   Low Earth (SSO)
  •   Low Earth (retrograde)
  •   Geosychronous
    (transfer)
  •   Medium Earth
  •   High Earth
  •   Heliocentric
Orbital regime Launches Achieved Not achieved Accidentally
achieved
Remarks
Transatmospheric 0 0 0 0
Low Earth / Sun-synchronous 0 0 0 0
Geosynchronous / GTO 0 0 0 0
Medium Earth 0 0 0 0
High Earth / Lunar transfer 0 0 0 0
Heliocentric / Planetary transfer 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Ariane 5 carries two satellites per mission; manifested payloads still need to be paired.

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External links

Generic references: