Biden set to impose restrictions on US travel from India amid Covid crisis – live

By Daniel Strauss in Washington

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Biden to impose travel restrictions on India starting Tuesday

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More on the breaking cat mews.

NBC asked how the Bidens thought things would go with Major, the first ever White House dog to come from a rescue shelter, who has been exiled to the family home in Delaware lately for training after having trouble adjusting to the busy White House and being involved in some biting incidents.

Jill Biden said that adapting to being around cats has been part of that training for Major. And it looks like the new cat will also be a rescue.

“That was part of his training. They took him into a shelter with cats,” she said.

Joe Biden interjected that, in fact, the Secret Service had taken Major in for that training.

“And he did fine,” Jill Biden said, laughing.

The Washington politeratti and press corps are on the edge of their collective seat waiting for the name.

The Clintons famously had young Chelsea Clinton’s black and white cat, unimaginatively named Socks, at the governor’s mansion in Arkansas, where Bill Clinton was governor, and then at the White House after he became president.

Socks memorably freaked out when Buddy, the Clintons’ new puppy, arrived.

Amy Carter had a Siamese cat called Misty Malarky Ying Yang and although George W and Laura Bush were famous for their scottie dogs Barney and Miss Beazley, they also had a jet-black cat called India who was a far more elusive presence at the White House.

In a comprehensive investigation by the Washington Post, the newspaper noted that although the first US president, George Washington, had a dog, the first White House cat is believed to have appeared when Abraham Lincoln was president.

In this Dec. 20, 1996, file photo President Clinton holds Socks the cat as he and first lady Hillary Clinton host Washington area elementary school children at the White House.

In this Dec. 20, 1996, file photo President Clinton holds Socks the cat as he and first lady Hillary Clinton host Washington area elementary school children at the White House. Photograph: Ruth Fremson/AP

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13:15

Here’s purrrfect Friday news. Get ready for COTUS - cat of the United States.

Move over, mischievous Major, chow down on this, Champ.

As if enough fur didn’t fly in Washington politics, the Bidens are bringing a cat to the White House, first lady Jill Biden announced on Friday.

The forthcoming feline will join the family canines, old dog Champ and his friskier younger friend Major the rescue dog, at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue in the near future.

In an interview on NBC on Friday morning, Jill Biden, sitting next to her husband, Joe Biden, was asked about speculation that a cat was being added to the White House menagerie.

“Oh, yes, that is true,” Jill Biden said. “He..”, she corrected herself: “She is waiting in the wings.”

Anchor Craig Melvin turned to Joe Biden and said: “Was this your idea, Mr President?”

The president looked like one who has had his patience tested, but affectionately, when he chuckled: “No. But it’s easy.”

More to follow!

TODAY (@TODAYshow)

“She is waiting in the wings,” said first lady Jill Biden about a cat joining the White House. pic.twitter.com/6OXvM08oNP

April 30, 2021

Updated

12:24

Health officials have concluded that a spate of bad reactions to vaccinations, including nausea, fainting and dizziness in five US states earlier this month was down to anxiety and not a problem with the shots.

The Associated Press brings this report:

Experts say the clusters detailed Friday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are an example of a phenomenon that’s been chronicled for decades from a variety of different vaccines. Basically, some people get so freaked out by injections that their anxiety spurs a physical reaction.

“We knew we were going to see this” as mass COVID-19 vaccine clinics were set up around the world, said Dr. Noni MacDonald, a Canadian researcher who has studied similar incidents.

The CDC authors said the reports came in over three days, April 7 to 9, from clinics in California, Colorado, Georgia, Iowa and North Carolina. The investigation was based on interviews with, and reports by, clinic staff.

Many of the 64 people affected either fainted or reported dizziness. Some got nauseous or vomited, and a few had racing hearts, chest pain or other symptoms. None got seriously ill.

All received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, and four of the the five clinics temporarily shut down as officials tried to sort out what was happening. Health officials at the time said they had no reason to suspect a problem with the vaccine itself.

Of the three COVID-19 vaccines authorized in the U.S., only J&J’s requires just one dose. That probably makes it more appealing to people who are nervous about shots and might leave them “more highly predisposed to anxiety-related events,” the CDC report said.

Some of the sites advertised they were giving J&J shots, noted Dr. Tom Shimabukuro, who leads the CDC’s COVID-19 vaccine safety monitoring work and is one of the study’s authors.

The CDC found that about a quarter of the people reporting side effects had similar things happen following past vaccinations.

The post-shot reactions differ from a very rare kind of side effect that led to a pause in administration of the J&J vaccine. At least 17 vaccine recipients have developed an uncommon kind of blood clot that developed in unusual places, such as veins that drain blood from the brain, along with abnormally low levels of the platelets that form clots.

Other types of side effects from the coronavirus vaccines are not unusual.

US Vice President Kamala Harris tours a Covid-19 vaccination site with Dr. Anthony Fauci (L), White House Chief Medical Adviser on Covid-19, at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore, Maryland, yesterday.

US Vice President Kamala Harris tours a Covid-19 vaccination site with Dr. Anthony Fauci (L), White House Chief Medical Adviser on Covid-19, at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore, Maryland, yesterday. Photograph: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

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11:53

Afternoon summary