Parallel Programming Laboratory


Relevant links: exascale relevance, the manual, mini-apps, downloads, charmplusplus.org
Charm++ is a machine independent parallel programming system. Programs written using this system will run unchanged on MIMD machines with or without a shared memory. It provides high-level mechanisms and strategies to facilitate the task of developing even highly complex parallel applications. Charm++ programs are written in C++ with a few library calls and an interface description language for publishing Charm++ objects. Charm++ supports multiple inheritance, late bindings, and polymorphism. Platforms: The system currently runs on IBM's Blue Gene/Q and OpenPOWER systems, Cray XE6, XK7, and XC40 systems, Infiniband and Omni-Path clusters, clusters of UNIX workstations and even single-processor UNIX, Mac, and Windows machines. It also contains support for running on accelerators such as Xeon Phis and GPGPUs.

The design of the system is based on the following tenets:

  1. Efficient Portability: Portability is an essential catalyst for the development of reusable parallel software. Charm++ programs run unchanged on MIMD machines with or without a shared memory. The programming model induces better data locality, allowing it to support machine independence without losing efficiency.
  2. Latency Tolerance: Latency of communication - the idea that remote data will take longer to access - is a significant issue common across most MIMD platforms. Message-driven execution, supported in Charm++, is a very useful mechanism for tolerating or hiding this latency. In message driven execution (which is distinct from just message-passing), a processor is allocated to a process only when a message for the process is received. This means when a process blocks, waiting for a message, another process may execute on the processor. It also means that a single process may block for any number of distinct messages, and will be awakened when any of these messages arrive. Thus, it forms an effective way of scheduling a processor in the presence of potentially large latencies.
  3. Dynamic Load Balancing: Dynamic creation and migration of work is necessary in many applications. Charm++ supports this by providing dynamic (as well as static) load balancing strategies.
  4. Reuse and Modularity: It should be possible to develop parallel software by reusing existing parallel software. Charm++ supports this with a well-developed ``module'' construct and associated mechanisms. These mechanisms allow for compositionality of modules without sacrificing the latency-tolerance. With them, two modules, each spread over hundreds of processors, may exchange data in a distributed fashion.

The Programming Model: Programs consist of potentially medium-grained processes (called chares), a special type of replicated process, and collections of chares. These processes interact with each other via messages. There may be thousands of medium-grained processes on each processor, or just a few, depending on the application. The ``replicated processes'' can also be used for implementing novel information sharing abstractions, distributed data structures, and intermodule interfaces. The system can be considered a concurrent object-oriented system with a clear separation between sequential and parallel objects. As shown in this figure, the objects are mapped by the runtime system to appropriate processors to balance the load.
Reusable Libraries: The modularity-related features make the system very attractive for building library modules that are highly reusable because they can be used in a variety of data-distributions. We have just begun the process of building such libraries, and have a small collection of library modules. However, we expect such libraries, contributed by us and other users, to be one of the most significant aspects of the system.

Regular and Irregular Computations: For regular computations, the system is useful because it provides portability, static load balancing, and latency tolerance via message driven execution, and facilitates construction and flexible reuse of libraries. The system is unique for the extensive support it provides for highly irregular computations. This includes management of many medium-grained processes, support for prioritization, dynamic load balancing strategies, handling of dynamic data-structures such as lists and graphs, etc.

20-03

2020
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16-20

2016
[PhD Thesis]

13-46

2013
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2013
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2013
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2013
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12-09

2012
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2011
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2009
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1990
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1990
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