9 Super Bowl Snacks to Eat All by Yourself


Illustration for article titled 9 Super Bowl Snacks to Eat All by Yourself
Photo: A.A. Newton

I hope you have banished the concept of a “Super Bowl party” from your brain, because there is no scenario in which it is acceptable for any American to host one for this particular Super Bowl. (Also haven’t we given Tom Brady enough attention? I mean, honestly—where does it end?)

You can still watch the game and—if you do that—you should make some snacks. You should make a whole feast, actually: A Super Bowl feast for one (or two, or however many are in your household). The following recipes certainly could be scaled up “for a crowd,” but it’s kind of nice that they don’t have to be. (Making one pizza is fun; making seven pizzas is a job.)

Claire is the Senior Food Editor for Lifehacker and a noted duck fat enthusiast. She lives in Portland, Oregon with a slightly hostile cat.

Illustration for article titled 9 Super Bowl Snacks to Eat All by Yourself
Photo: Claire Lower

It’s hard to make a modest amount of chili, but I have confidence you will power through a good bit of this working-class Texas recipe before halftime. It’s made with meat, onion, garlic, a little tomato sauce, and a myriad of spices, and it was absolutely destined for Frito pie. (Cheese-wise, Whiz is the move, in my opinion.) If you or someone in your household doesn’t eat meat, don’t worry—a soyrizo Frito pie will please the whole team.

Illustration for article titled 9 Super Bowl Snacks to Eat All by Yourself
Photo: Jonathan Bender

I actually have two casserole creations that would be appropriate for Sunday, and both are complete home runs. One is basically a pile of potato skins, but it’s an artfully and thoughtfully arranged pile of potato skins. The other is pure chaos. (If you’ve ever wanted to experience pizza, buffalo chicken dip, and queso in a single bite, choose chaos.)

The beauty of making your own Crunchwraps lies in your ability to tweak the filling. You can use ground beef (and make it really tender and tasty), or you could swap out the protein entirely. You could even stuff your crunchy wraps with Taco Bell-style potatoes, or Taco Bell-style potatoes and beef, if you’re feeling feisty.

Illustration for article titled 9 Super Bowl Snacks to Eat All by Yourself
Photo: Brent Hofacker (Shutterstock)

This is the low-energy option. Grab some bacon grease (like, a lot), pop some corn in it, and season that popped corn with MSG, shaker parm, nutritional yeast, or all three. Drink with beer and repeat until you are satiated.

Illustration for article titled 9 Super Bowl Snacks to Eat All by Yourself
Photo: A.A. Newton

I have been really into these Instant Pot burgers lately and, since you can’t really cook more than four or so at a time, they’re perfect for a small Super Bowl. I’ve made them twice so far this year, and I love how meaty and easy they are. They’re what fast food burgers strive to be and, once they’re in the IP, they require absolutely no attention from their maker whatsoever, which means you won’t have to miss a minute of the game (or the commercials).

Illustration for article titled 9 Super Bowl Snacks to Eat All by Yourself
Photo: Claire Lower

If you have an air fryer, I strongly suggest you cook a few hot dogs in that thing. They come out taut and glistening, like the roller dogs you’d get at 7-Eleven, but less troubling. They’re good with a simple drizzle of mustard, but Super Bowl Sunday calls for decadence. Super Bowl Sunday calls for chili dogs, and isn’t it lucky that you already have the perfect chili recipe for the job? (See slide one.)

Illustration for article titled 9 Super Bowl Snacks to Eat All by Yourself
Photo: nelea33 (Shutterstock)

I refuse to choose between stretchy cheese and creamy queso, but guess what? I don’t have to (and I don’t have to share). You can mix them together to create a saucy cheese with a crazy amount of stretch that stays dippable and spreadable even at room temperature. (Which means fewer broken corn chips.)

Illustration for article titled 9 Super Bowl Snacks to Eat All by Yourself
Photo: Claire Lower

I have two strategies for better artichoke dip. My first? Get rid of the spinach and replace it with sturdier, more flavorful Brussels sprouts. The second? Add some pepper jack cheese. It’s the perfect mix of creamy and salty, delivering good cheese pulls and a faint, sweet heat that keeps one’s taste buds fully engaged in the dip-eating process. Combine these two tips, and you have a better, more flavorful hot dip (that, once again, you don’t have to share).

Illustration for article titled 9 Super Bowl Snacks to Eat All by Yourself
Photo: A.A. Newton

If you are in somewhere in your 30s, you probably remember the dawn of the Stuffed Crust Pizza, and you probably lost your damn mind over it. Well, you’re a grown-up now, which means you can use the oven and make your own, and choose the toppings without input from your parents (or, for this particular Super Bowl, your guests). The “stuffed” portion of the pizza is made possible by another ‘90s icon—the humble string cheese. Consume while wearing Skechers platform sneakers for maximum nostalgia.

Claire is the Senior Food Editor for Lifehacker and a noted duck fat enthusiast. She lives in Portland, Oregon with a slightly hostile cat.


Page 2

Illustration for article titled 9 Super Bowl Snacks to Eat All by Yourself
Photo: A.A. Newton

I hope you have banished the concept of a “Super Bowl party” from your brain, because there is no scenario in which it is acceptable for any American to host one for this particular Super Bowl. (Also haven’t we given Tom Brady enough attention? I mean, honestly—where does it end?)

You can still watch the game and—if you do that—you should make some snacks. You should make a whole feast, actually: A Super Bowl feast for one (or two, or however many are in your household). The following recipes certainly could be scaled up “for a crowd,” but it’s kind of nice that they don’t have to be. (Making one pizza is fun; making seven pizzas is a job.)

Claire is the Senior Food Editor for Lifehacker and a noted duck fat enthusiast. She lives in Portland, Oregon with a slightly hostile cat.

Illustration for article titled 9 Super Bowl Snacks to Eat All by Yourself
Photo: Claire Lower

It’s hard to make a modest amount of chili, but I have confidence you will power through a good bit of this working-class Texas recipe before halftime. It’s made with meat, onion, garlic, a little tomato sauce, and a myriad of spices, and it was absolutely destined for Frito pie. (Cheese-wise, Whiz is the move, in my opinion.) If you or someone in your household doesn’t eat meat, don’t worry—a soyrizo Frito pie will please the whole team.

Illustration for article titled 9 Super Bowl Snacks to Eat All by Yourself
Photo: Jonathan Bender

I actually have two casserole creations that would be appropriate for Sunday, and both are complete home runs. One is basically a pile of potato skins, but it’s an artfully and thoughtfully arranged pile of potato skins. The other is pure chaos. (If you’ve ever wanted to experience pizza, buffalo chicken dip, and queso in a single bite, choose chaos.)

The beauty of making your own Crunchwraps lies in your ability to tweak the filling. You can use ground beef (and make it really tender and tasty), or you could swap out the protein entirely. You could even stuff your crunchy wraps with Taco Bell-style potatoes, or Taco Bell-style potatoes and beef, if you’re feeling feisty.

Illustration for article titled 9 Super Bowl Snacks to Eat All by Yourself
Photo: Brent Hofacker (Shutterstock)

This is the low-energy option. Grab some bacon grease (like, a lot), pop some corn in it, and season that popped corn with MSG, shaker parm, nutritional yeast, or all three. Drink with beer and repeat until you are satiated.

Illustration for article titled 9 Super Bowl Snacks to Eat All by Yourself
Photo: A.A. Newton

I have been really into these Instant Pot burgers lately and, since you can’t really cook more than four or so at a time, they’re perfect for a small Super Bowl. I’ve made them twice so far this year, and I love how meaty and easy they are. They’re what fast food burgers strive to be and, once they’re in the IP, they require absolutely no attention from their maker whatsoever, which means you won’t have to miss a minute of the game (or the commercials).

Illustration for article titled 9 Super Bowl Snacks to Eat All by Yourself
Photo: Claire Lower

If you have an air fryer, I strongly suggest you cook a few hot dogs in that thing. They come out taut and glistening, like the roller dogs you’d get at 7-Eleven, but less troubling. They’re good with a simple drizzle of mustard, but Super Bowl Sunday calls for decadence. Super Bowl Sunday calls for chili dogs, and isn’t it lucky that you already have the perfect chili recipe for the job? (See slide one.)

Illustration for article titled 9 Super Bowl Snacks to Eat All by Yourself
Photo: nelea33 (Shutterstock)

I refuse to choose between stretchy cheese and creamy queso, but guess what? I don’t have to (and I don’t have to share). You can mix them together to create a saucy cheese with a crazy amount of stretch that stays dippable and spreadable even at room temperature. (Which means fewer broken corn chips.)

Illustration for article titled 9 Super Bowl Snacks to Eat All by Yourself
Photo: Claire Lower

I have two strategies for better artichoke dip. My first? Get rid of the spinach and replace it with sturdier, more flavorful Brussels sprouts. The second? Add some pepper jack cheese. It’s the perfect mix of creamy and salty, delivering good cheese pulls and a faint, sweet heat that keeps one’s taste buds fully engaged in the dip-eating process. Combine these two tips, and you have a better, more flavorful hot dip (that, once again, you don’t have to share).

Illustration for article titled 9 Super Bowl Snacks to Eat All by Yourself
Photo: A.A. Newton

If you are in somewhere in your 30s, you probably remember the dawn of the Stuffed Crust Pizza, and you probably lost your damn mind over it. Well, you’re a grown-up now, which means you can use the oven and make your own, and choose the toppings without input from your parents (or, for this particular Super Bowl, your guests). The “stuffed” portion of the pizza is made possible by another ‘90s icon—the humble string cheese. Consume while wearing Skechers platform sneakers for maximum nostalgia.

Claire is the Senior Food Editor for Lifehacker and a noted duck fat enthusiast. She lives in Portland, Oregon with a slightly hostile cat.