Stop Guessing. Know Your User Feedback Tools Now.


Let me provide you with a hypothetical scenario that plays out on your website at least once a day. You created a Facebook Ad that directs traffic to a specific page on your website. For every 100 clicks, 25 of them stay for at least 60 seconds. Then 2 of them actually sign up for your service. Wouldn’t it be nice to know what those other 23 people were thinking about?

Creating a customer feedback strategy can unlock your websites potential. It’s no wonder everyone’s installing bots on their websites, but which bot is right for you, and should you even use a bot? This post will help guide the requirements needed in customer feedback and the data points you should be focused on.

Start with the user experience

When a user is hitting friction on your site and they’re willing to share that feedback, your website must be ready to spring into action to answer their call and hear them out! A good feedback loop/experience (link) can do three key things – First, provide them with the answers they couldn’t find otherwise. Second, it’s a new dialogue and an opportunity to hear their request and follow up. Lastly (and if they bounce), it can at least provide you with what they were looking for so you can update your site/bot to make sure the next user with the same question doesn’t bounce.

Floating bot icon

This is a universal standard for customer support and feedback tools. A small widget floats on the bottom right of your website and follows users from page to page. Because so many websites implement this feature, it’s advisable to follow the convention. Users are already trained in where to go to send complaints and it’s a seamless experience for most users.

Blue icon on the bottom right.
Blue icon on the bottom right.

Floating sentiment score

The second most common feedback tool is a smaller floating user interface prompting the user to hit a number or emoji that best matches their current experience. This has been a great source of getting a rapid amount of feedback and operates the same way customers review products on the App Store or on E-commerce websites.

Emoji rating on the bottom left.
Emoji rating on the bottom left.

Feedback buttons

A more traditional route is to add feedback buttons across your website. The most popular option is a general feedback in the global header or footer of your website. However, a better experience is to inline these buttons across the website. The experience would feel more natural to the user’s current context and would represent your willingness to catch users in every negative situation.

Feedback Button.
Feedback Button.

Feedback Methods

Your feedback strategy should start with automation. All entry points to collect feedback should be easy on the user but also easy for the business to collect. Below are three methods you can use to start collecting feedback on your website.

Net Promoter Score and Emoji Score

Collecting data to aggregate your Net Promoter Score (NPS) is a quick way of gaining a high volume amount of feedback metrics. Instead of obtaining written feedback that a human needs to parse, you can straightforwardly ask users to rank their experience. There are a few ways to achieve this, but one of the best ways I’m seen is using Emojis instead of numbers. It’s a little bit more quirky as a visual but will gain more engagement than using the traditional number 1-10 range.

NPS example.
NPS example.

Live Chat

Live chat is by far the most popular form of collecting feedback and it’s easy for the customer to simply type whatever they want in the chat form. However, you will be spending a huge amount of time maintaining live chat conversations and both recording and cataloging each piece of feedback periodically. You also have to be operating a live chat service 24/7 or you’ll risk turning off your users. Make sure you understand all the pros and cons before subscribing to live chat like Intercom or Drift.

Typical live chat conversation.
Typical live chat conversation.

Question and Answer Experiences (Q&A)

Similar to Quora, the optimal experience to gain feedback is to allow users to see what other’s were asking. This helps answer your user’s questions or helps guide the conversation to uncover what they are really looking for. It also gives them assurance that they are not alone and you are active in the conversation and committed to solving their problem. Additionally, sometimes another user’s Q&A helps solve the user about to report feedback. With ChipBot, we’ve seen this happen at an increasing rate, and it saves real time on the business owner.

Question and Answer Example.
Question and Answer Example.

When users can’t find an answer to their question, this is a great opportunity to offer them a  form to ask a question.

Have an ability for your users to ask you questions.
Have an ability for your users to ask you questions.

How Can I Start Collecting Feedback On My Website?

  • Emojics for NPS – These guys do a great job creating a good Emoji-based rating experience. Use Emojics if you want something lightweight for feedback and need a quick way of calculating a score. Their widget is a floating sentiment score that uses emojis as a way to capture NPS.
  • Intercom for live chat – This is a household name and everyone knows them. However, they still require manning live chat and are pretty expensive for startups and small business owners.
  • ChipBot for Q&A feedback – Shameless plug here. ChipBot is a great tool for creating Q&A content that encourages feedback and provides customer support at the same time. In addition, you can collect deep insights into your user behavior’s to narrow in on specific issues of your website.