Democrats hold Senate floor overnight to protest Amy Coney Barrett confirmation – live

By Tom McCarthy

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McConnell: 'they won't be able to do much about this for a long time'

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The Republican party has become dramatically more illiberal in the past two decades and now more closely resembles ruling parties in autocratic societies than its former centre-right equivalents in Europe, according to a new international study.

In a significant shift since 2000, the GOP has taken to demonising and encouraging violence against its opponents, adopting attitudes and tactics comparable to ruling nationalist parties in Hungary, India, Poland and Turkey.

The shift has both led to and been driven by the rise of Donald Trump.

Becky Momberger reacts while watching the presidential debate at a Republican watch party Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2020, in Katy, Texas.

Becky Momberger reacts while watching the presidential debate at a Republican watch party Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2020, in Katy, Texas. Photograph: David J Phillip/AP

By contrast the Democratic party has changed little in its attachment to democratic norms, and in that regard has remained similar to centre-right and centre-left parties in western Europe. Their principal difference is the approach to the economy.

The new study, the largest ever of its kind, was carried out by the V-Dem Institute at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden, using newly developed methods to measure and quantify the health of the world’s democracies at a time when authoritarianism is on the rise.

Anna Lührmann, V-Dem’s deputy director, said the Republican transformation had been “certainly the most dramatic shift in an established democracy”.

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Democrats hold senate floor overnight in protest of Barrett

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