Coronavirus Australia live update: Victoria records 113 new Covid cases and 12 deaths as NSW reports 13 cases

By Naaman Zhou (now) and Calla Wahlquist (earlier)

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NZ stock exchange disrupted by fourth cyber-attack

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Listen to Paul Kelly, not Craig Kelly, says deputy CMO

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Victorian hotel quarantine guest escaped while guard was looking at his phone

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Police call Melbourne anti-lockdown rally 'batshit crazy nonsense'

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Landlords are not ‘evil unyielding monsters’, say real estate agents

Landlords are the “forgotten people” of the economic slump caused by the coronavirus crisis and are not “evil and unyielding monsters”, Victoria’s peak body representing real estate agents says.

The Real Estate Institute of Victoria says the state government’s decision to extend a moratorium on evicting people from their homes to the end of the year shows that “commercial and residential landlords are being left behind and all but forgotten as the government makes decisions on financial support for people impacted by the economic downturn”.

With Melbourne in a hard lockdown due to a second wave of infections, the Victorian government last week extended the eviction moratorium, which covers both residential and commercial tenants, to 31 December. Cash payments of $3,000 are also available to some landlords.

This is all terribly unfair, according to the REIV.

The legislation is now unfairly and squarely biased against those property owners who have worked hard to save and invest to provide for the future of their families.

A property owner’s savings and hard work is somehow of lesser perceived value than that of a tenant.

With unemployment skyrocketing, Victoria’s economy in deep depression and businesses closing down in droves, it is not clear where the REIV thinks landlords are going to get fresh tenants from if they tip the existing ones out on to the streets.

And if they do, they’re likely to get less money – anecdotally, rents have fallen away.Nor does the statement canvass the obvious solution available to any landlord with a cashflow problem because the rent has stopped: sell the property.

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Tasmanian state of emergency extended to end of October

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