DJI's Osmo Action Camera Is on Sale Now

By Scott Gilbertson

GoPro's Hero lineup is the most recognizable action camera on the market, but drone-maker DJI has the Osmo Action, a compelling alternative especially when it's $100 off like it is right now.

The Osmo Action (8/10, WIRED Recommends) has some tricks GoPro cameras lack, like a wonderfully bright color front screen that makes it much easier to reliably get yourself in the shot.

Right now, you can buy the DJI Osmo Action at the lowest prices we've seen, Amazon ($249), Best Buy ($249), B&H Photo ($249), and Adorama ($249). It's a full $120 off the regular $369 price tag.

If you want to go the opposite direction artistically and capture some buttery smooth handheld 4K video, the DJI Osmo Pocket Gimbal (8/10, WIRED Recommends) is also on sale. You can grab the pocketable, gimbal-mounted camera for $294 at Amazon, or for $299 at Adorama, Best Buy, and B&HPhoto (back ordered). That's around $70 off.

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Is the Osmo Action Right For You?

WIRED: The color front screen makes it easier to frame your shot from the end of a selfie stick. It's small, and sometimes hard to see details, but it's clear enough to make sure you're not missing your scene entirely. The image stabilization is very good—not quite up to par with a GoPro Hero 8, but close enough that most of us non-pros will walk away with a good video. The HDR video option is very handy for opening up shadows in backlit shots and does so even when panning into a scene. The Osmo Action is compatible with most mounts and accessories designed for the GoPro, with the exception being lens filters. Those are screw-mount filters on the Osmo Action.

TIRED: The Osmo Action does lack a few features that might be important to some. The biggest flaw is the lack of GPS support. Unlike the GoPro Hero 8, you won't be able to pair your photos up with a GPS track. There's also no integrated support for getting your shots and videos on social media. And I think the blue text in the menus is hard to see in bright sunlight, which can make it difficult to change settings on the fly.

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